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Sonnet 130 Analysis

"My Mistress the Hag"
by

Tyler Swett

on 4 January 2013

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Transcript of Sonnet 130 Analysis

Title My Mistress the Hag Sonnet 130

-His 130th sonnet, experienced in writing and creating meaning behind his work
-Standard Shakespearean sonnet
-Written by William Shakespeare Paraphrase My mistress has cold black eyes;
Coral is redder than her lips;
She has dull skin;
Her hair is like black wire;
Her cheeks are not rosy;
There are some perfumes that smell better
Than the stench of her breath;
I love to hear her talk, yet
Music sounds much better;
I have never seen a goddess;
Yet, by heaven, I love her
More than any love she has lied about. Shifts Shift Occurs at line 9

Goes from describing faults
To describing why he loves her Connotation Rhyme scheme - ababcdcdefefgg
Metaphor - eyes to sun, lips to coral, skin to snow, hair to wire
- Negative diction to positive diction
- Comparisons to inanimate objects
Title "My Mistress the Hag"
The mistress may have an unappealing outward appearance, but the author still loves her My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare. Attitude Tone - reflective My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare. Theme Love is Blind - He loves her even though she looks like a troll
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