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Extreme Makeover- LDC (Tajikistan) Edition

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by

Sarah Giles

on 25 May 2011

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Transcript of Extreme Makeover- LDC (Tajikistan) Edition

In 2008, Tajikistan faced one of its coldest winters in years coupled with an energy crisis. In April of that year, it was asked to repay a US$47 million loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) after the IMF learned that Tajikistan had applied for the loan with falsified data. In an effort to solve some of its financial problems, Tajikistan agreed to allow the U.S. military to transport non-military supplies across its territory to U.S. troops in Afghanistan. It continues to struggle, however, to pay for basic necessities, such as fuel from neighboring Uzbekistan. International observers noted that the 2010 parliamentary elections were rife with fraud. Extreme Makeover- Tajikistan Edition A Brief History... Tajikistan, formerly known as the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic came under the Russian rule in the 1860s and declared its sovereignty from Russian rule in August of 1990. In the 15th century, feuding tribes, economic decay, and the discovery of a seaway trade route led to the collapse of trade along the Silk Road, a trade route traveled by many. Anti-Soviet sentiment was never far from the surface, and in the late 1980s, Tajik protests became more vocal and even violent. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Tajikistan declared independence and became a founding member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). In 1992, a clan-based power struggle erupted into civil war. Tens of thousands died, and about one million people were displaced by fighting between factions of the Soviet-era power elite and an opposing coalition of Islamists and liberals. The secular government and the mostly Islamic opposition reached a peace agreement in 1997, under which President Emomali Rahmon remained chief of state. In 2008, Tajikistan faced one of its coldest winters in years coupled with an energy crisis. In April of that year, it was asked to repay a US$47 million loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) after the IMF learned that Tajikistan had applied for the loan with falsified data. In an effort to solve some of its financial problems, Tajikistan agreed to allow the U.S. military to transport non-military supplies across its territory to U.S. troops in Afghanistan. It continues to struggle, however, to pay for basic necessities, such as fuel from neighboring Uzbekistan. International observers noted that the 2010 parliamentary elections were rife with fraud. This is President Emomali Rahmon. Ethnic/Cultural Make-Up Ethnic Make-Up: 80 percent are ethnic Tajiks, 15 percent are Uzbeks, and 1 percent are Russians Small groups of Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Turkmen, and other nationalities also live in Tajikistan. Only about 26 percent of Tajikistan's population lives in urban areas. Uzbeks are more commonly found in the southwest and west, while Russians live in larger towns and the capital of Dushanbe. Language and Religion In 1989, Tojiki (Tajik) replaced Russian as the official language, and its everyday use is becoming more prevalent. Tajik belongs to the southwest Iranian group of languages and is closely related to Farsi, or Persian. In 1989, Tojiki (Tajik) replaced Russian as the official language, and its everyday use is becoming more prevalent. Tajik belongs to the southwest Iranian group of languages and is closely related to Farsi, or Persian. Most Tajiks and ethnic Uzbeks are Sunni Muslims. The Pamiris are mostly members of the Ismaʾili (Shiʿi Muslim) sect. Russian Orthodox and other Christian churches are also represented, and there is a small Jewish community. Just a quick overview of Economy... The poorest of the former Soviet republics, Tajikistan is also one of the most rural; 67 percent of its people work in agriculture. Minerals (gold, iron, lead, mercury, bauxite, tin) and hydroelectric power from the mountains, together with cotton, silk, fruits, and vegetables, form the foundation of the economy. Unfortunately, the economy has suffered from civil war and the loss of Soviet-era trade and supply links. Political instability made it nearly impossible to implement serious market reform after independence, although the government has worked to privatize small state businesses. The government has sought increased economic cooperation and trade with its major trading partner, Russia. However, the 2008 global financial crisis hurt Tajikistan's exports and decreased remittances from abroad. The drug trade disrupts growth as it becomes more violent, attracts more labor, and addicts more young people. In 2000, the government changed the currency from the Tajik ruble to the somoni (TJS). Our Plan! Since drug wars are a big part of what is hurting the economy (by becoming more violent and attracting more young people), we figured we would make cheap, acessable, required rehabilitation centers (rehab). Also, the government will keep closer tabs on the illegal drug trade. It is illegal, but people still get away with it. The estimated cost of building one three story, 75 bed rehabilitation center is $6,500,000,000 (6.5 million). We are now left with 93,500,000,000. Another issue that needs to be addressed is debt. Tajikistan owes a lot of money to Russia and the United States, so $100,000,000 will go to paying off that debt. This leaves us with $93,400,000,000. As the majority of the population is involved in Agriculture, there is no need for proper roads, as they can get around fine without them. However, the cleanliness of Tajikistan needs to be improved. Building one fresh water well costs about $5,000. Having fresh water will allow them to not be forced to use a river for water. Having fresh water will improve their standard of living greatly. We will build 50 fresh water wells in Tajikistan. This will cost a total of $250000, leaving us with $93,399,750,000. Going back to the issue of the drug wars, most of the people involved have no other source of income and are severely impoverished. Therefore, when they get out of rehab, they will need a source of income. We will get American jobs outsourced to Tajikistan. The approximate cost of this will be $5 million. We now have $92,899,750,000. People cannot work in outsourced jobs without having an education. So we will spend $800,000,000 on education, building schools specifically. This leaves us with $92,099,550,000. With our remaining money, ($92,099,550,000), we will build homes, orphanages, apartments, and other such urban living spaces. THE END!!!! Come visit Tajikistan!
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