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Maslow’s Motivation Theory and Herzberg’s Two Factor Theory

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Dhairya Momaya

on 4 September 2013

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Transcript of Maslow’s Motivation Theory and Herzberg’s Two Factor Theory

Maslow’s Motivation theory and Herzberg’s Two Factor Theory
Abraham Maslow's Motivation theory
The basis of Maslow's theory is that human beings are motivated by unsatisfied needs, and that certain lower needs need to be satisfied before higher needs can be satisfied.

The hierarchy of needs for human motivation listed by Maslow are in the following order:
The Two Factor Theory
Herzberg found that not all factors motivate, employees had expectations of treatment in work, and if these expectations were absent it led to de-motivation ß So he argued that people’s satisfaction and dissatisfaction are influenced by two independent sets of factors ß He classified there factors as-
HYGIENE FACTORS
MOTIVATION FACTORS
Physiological or survival needs
Physiological needs are those required to sustain life, such as:
Air
Water
Food
Sleep

Safety Needs
Once physiological needs are met, one's attention turns to safety and security in order to be free from the threat of physical and emotional harm. Such needs might be fulfilled by:
Living in a safe area
Medical insurance
Job security
Financial reserves

Love Affection And Belongingness Needs
These are those related to interaction with others and may include:
Friendship
Belonging to a group
Giving and receiving love
Esteem Needs
Esteem needs may be classified as internal or external.
Internal esteem needs are those related to self-esteem such as self respect and achievement.
External esteem needs are those such as social status and recognition. Some esteem needs are Attention, Recognition, Reputation.

Need for Self Actualization
MASLOW EMPHASIZES NEED FOR SELF ACTUALIZATION IS
A HEALTHY INDIVIDUAL’S PRIME
MOTIVATION. Self-actualization is the summit of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. It is the quest of reaching one's full potential as a person. Self-actualized people tend to have needs such as:
Truth
Justice
Wisdom
Meaning


What Is Motivation?
Motivation is defined as Internal and external factors that stimulate desire and energy in people to be continually interested and committed to a job, role or subject, or to make an effort to attain a goal
Abraham Maslow
Hierarchy of needs
HYGIENE FACTORS
The organization, its policies & administration

Kind of supervision

Relationship with supervisor

Work conditions

Salary

Status

Job security

Interpersonal relations
MOTIVATION FACTORS
Awards and Accomplishment

Recognition

Achievement

Advancement

Growth

Responsibility

Job Challenge


The Two Factor Theory, assumes that job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction are distinct from each other, and therefore must be dealt with separately.
Motivators can motivate, but only if employers ensure that there are no de-motivating factors in place -- that is hygiene factors are satisfied.
The Hygiene factors can de-motivate or cause dissatisfaction if they are not present, but do not very often create satisfaction when they are present.
However, Motivation factors do motivate or create satisfaction and are rarely the cause of dissatisfaction.
The most important part of the theory of motivation presented by Herzberg is that the main motivating factors are not in the environment but in the intrinsic value and satisfaction gained from the job itself.
Therefore to motivate an individual, a job itself must be challenging, have scope for enrichment and be of interest to the jobholder.
Frederick Irving Herzberg
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