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Sonnets v.s. Light Verse

Assignment 10 for English 11 Online. A comparison between "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" by William Wordsworth (a sonnet) and "Crazy Times" by Miriam Waddington (a light verse poem), along with a poem of my own!
by

Vanessa Chan

on 19 May 2014

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Transcript of Sonnets v.s. Light Verse

Figurative Language
Sonnet
Structure and Rhyme Scheme
Sonnet
Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

Sonnet
Crazy Times
Light Verse
Oh, Give Me a Hymn!
Tone and Theme
Give me a hymn! God, please help.
Jim, our neighbour, is haughty;
and when he gets in a bout
we would pull him right out.
(Hey, don't you dare pout!)

That boy sure was
as naughty
as heck!

Jim
we found,
voice a shout,
(oh does he cloy)
cursing Santa Claus.
Oh, his small mouth's potty.
Please save me; oh, birds, go peck!
About My Poem
"Oh, Give Me a Hymn!" is a humorous
light verse poem
about the narrator's neighbour,
Jim
. He's such a bad kid, the narrator needs a
hymn of prayer
to keep from doing something he might
regret
! The poem is separated into
3 verses
. The first is
introductory
to the two characters - Jim and the narrator; the second is a
transition
; the third, and final, verse is when the
narrator discovers Jim is even worse
than before. Not only is he a troublemaker - he's got a potty mouth! For the poem, I
focused more on the syllables
than anything else.
I started with 8 syllables took off one syllable for each line, then reversing it, ending again with 8.
The poem did originally have a
rhyming scheme
, but it eventually got mixed as I focused more on the syllables. For example, "
boy
" from the second verse was supposed to
rhyme
with "
cloy
". My allusion to
Santa
, implied he didn't get
gifts for Christmas
. As for my
inspiration
, I had decided I wanted to use the word
haughty
and
kept rhyming
and playing with the words at the ends until I had the
theme of this naughty boy
named Jim.
Understanding & Reflection
I preferred "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" by William Wordsworth because it felt like something I would be able to experience.
To my understanding, the poems are very different. Wordsworth's poem is about an
amazing sight
that he sees; to me, he has written this poem to
share his experience
where the "Earth has not anything to show more fair" (1). "Crazy Times" is more of how
friends will come together
someday to talk.
The world will be upside-down
, but it'll be alright, we'll just "sit by our fires / and warm our hands". (14-15)
Sonnets v.s. Light Verse
by William Wordsworth
Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth, like a garment wear
The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first splendour valley, rock, or hill;
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/william-wordsworth
by Miriam Waddington
http://lifeinlegacy.com/2004/WIR20040313.html
When the birds riot
and the airplanes walk,
when the busy sit,
and the silent talk;

When the rains blow
and the winds pour,
when the sky is a land
and the sea its shore,

When shells grow snails
and worms eat toads,
when winters chase summers
on upside-down roads,

We'll sit by our fires
and warm our hands,
and tell old tales
of bygone lands.

Compare & Contrast
by: Vanessa Chan
For English 11
Assignment 10
Mrs.Castro
Light Verse
Miriam Waddington's
lyrical
poem contains
four quatrains
, each
rhyming
on the
end
of the second and fourth lines.
The
volta
, or "turn", of the poem happens in the
fourth,
and last,
quatrain
, where we find out what will happen when all the crazy things occur.
When the birds riot
and the airplanes walk,
when the busy sit,
and the silent talk;
A
B
C
B
The
second and third
quatrains have the
same pattern
of syllables (4, 4, 5, 6). While the first consists of only
five syllables
each line.
"Crazy Times" is written in the
future tense
.
When
|
the
|
rains
|
blow
and
|
the
|
winds
|
pour,
when
|
the
|
sky
|
is
|
a
|
land
and
|
the
|
sea
|
its
|
shore,
When
|
shells
|
grow
|
snails
and
|
worms
|
eat
|
toads,
when
|
win
|
ters
|
chase
|
sum
|
mers
on
|
up
|
side
|
-down
|
roads,
Wordsworth's
descriptive
poem, holding the emotion of a
lyrical
poem, is also a
sonnet
; it has 14 lines and is
not separated
into
stanzas
.
The poem has a
rhyming pattern
of ABCAABBADEDEDE.
A
B
C
A
A
B
B
A
D
E
D
E
D
E
fair
by
majesty
wear
bare
lie
sky
air
steep
hill
deep
will
asleep
still
Each of the 14 lines in "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" is
10 syllables long
.
The poem starts the first
three
lines with a
dactylic meter
. As the poem goes on, an
iambic meter
is recognizable.
Earth
has not
an
ything
to

show
more
fair
:
Dull would
he
be of
soul
who could
pass
by
A
sight
so
touch
ing in its
ma
jesty:
There is an
irregularity
to the dactylic meter in the third line.
The narration is
present tense
but compares to sights of the past.
Light Verse
Waddington uses multiple techniques for figurative language; most notably, she uses
personification
. For example, "the airplanes
walk
". (2)
The author also uses
oxymoron
(strong contrast) in her poem, stating "the busy sit, / and the silent talk". (3-4)
taptaptap
The poem is also full of examples of
hyperbole
, for example when "worms eat toads" (10), which is highly
improbable
!
All the literary devices used seem to
emphasize
the ridiculous time it will be when the narrator and their audience come together to speak. "Crazy Times", indeed.
Immediately, the poem has a
hyperbole
. "Earth has not anything to show more fair". (1)
Personification
is also utilized - "The City, now doth, like a garment
wear
/ The beauty of the morning". (4-5) As well, the "Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples
lie
". (6)
In fact, personification is used
five times
in this poem.
The use of
t
owers and
t
emples in the same line (line 6) is also an example of an
alliteration
.
Overall, the different techniques are used to aid the
imagery
of the poem, allowing the reader to know just how wonderful the sight was.
Sonnet
Light Verse
about a
scenery
that the narrator marvels
in the present; also
refers
to a
past
(
comparing
)
about meeting again to
tell stories
in the present;
speaking
of the
future
(
anticipating
)
use of hyperbole - both are something to be
excited
about
personified objects are
fantastical
After reading the two different poems, I think that I prefer the
sonnet
. However, it is mostly because I find
Waddington's quatrain form
to be
boring
. I prefer how Wordsworth has
varied where he rhymes
in his sonnet. However, in general, I think I would prefer the humour of
light verse
.
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