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Frankenstein

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Tiffany Hallin

on 20 October 2016

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Transcript of Frankenstein

Frankenstein
FONTS
Romanticism
Individual.
Intuition.
Imagination.
The Gothic Novel
Characteristics
The Byronic Hero
1. Dark qualities
Frankenstein's = "Monster"
Articulate
Intelligent
Capable of feelings, of passions
“It is with considerable difficulty that I remember the original era of my being; all the events of that period appear confused and indistinct” (Shelley 87).

Four Corners
Decide whether you strongly or somewhat agree or disagree with the following statements:
1. It is a
parent's
job, more than
society's
, to
nurture
his or her child.
2. All children are innately
good
.
3. Every child needs "
mothering
" in order to become "
human
."
4. All parents
love
their children
unconditionally
, no matter how they look or act.
5. Advances in
science and technology
are always positive for mankind.
Nope.
Shifts occurred:
Reason

Urban

Scientific
Feelings

Rural/natural

Mysterious
1. Imagination has no limits
2. Passion for human emotion
3. All humans = innately good
4. Free thought - Opposed to social conventions
5. Belief in supernatural
6. Nature has power to heal and destroy
TENETS OF ROMANTICISM
introspection

psychology

melancholy

rebellion
1. Exotic setting
2. Extreme landscapes and/or weather
3. Tyrants, villains, femmes fatales, magicians, vampires, werewolves, etc.
4. Mystery, suspense
5. Focus on death/the macabre
6. Intense emotion
7. Passionate hero
2. Isolated from society
3. Moody, passionate
4. Intelligent, hypersensitive, and arrogant
5. Reject moral codes of society and so becomes repulsive
6. Regrets for actions and self-criticism
6. If you are
passionate
about something, you shouldn't let any people, rules, or laws stop you from pursuing what you love.
Shelley's Creature
Focuses of Romanticism
Mary Shelley
1. Daughter of two
intellectual radicals
: William Godwin (philosopher and novelist) & Mary Wollstonecraft (pioneer for women's rights)
2.
Well-educated
by extensive reading but also meeting great minds of the day
3. Eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley (famous poet) at 16 yrs.
"Romantic beyond romance"
till he died eight years after their marriage
4. Wrote Frankenstein at the age of 19!
day one:
In your textbook, read "The Creation of Man by Prometheus" by John M. Hunt on pg. 281.
day two
Journal
The title of this novel is
Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus
. Based on prior knowledge and your reading of the myth of Prometheus, why do you think Mary Shelley chose the second, allusive title for her story?
Letters 1-2
Vocabulary
Literary Devices
Assignment
1. "I shall
satiate
my
ardent
curiosity with the sight of a part of the world never before visited..."
2. "I commenced by
inuring
my body to hardship."
3. "I have no one near me, gentle yet courageous, possessed of a cultivated as well as of a
capacious
mind, whose tastes are like my own, to approve or amend my plans."

Frame narrative
Allusion
Imagery
Characterization
Reference made to another piece of literature, art, or culture. Most common: Shakespeare, Bible, Greek and Roman mythology
satisfy fully
enthusiastic or passionate
accustom (someone) to something, especially unpleasant
having a lot of space inside; roomy
The use of sense words to evoke vivid mental "pictures"
Story within a story
Direct
= anything the author tells you about a character
Indirect
= Anything the character says, does, thinks, feels, etc.
Foreshadowing
Hints/clues that suggest events that will happen later in the text
Frame One: Letters 1-4
robert walton
The stranger
gothic hero
Quotations
Characterization
Quotations
Characterization
Note qualities of the Byronic hero that become evident through the details revealed about and by these two characters
Chapters 1-2
frame two: the stranger's story
Vocabulary
"He was respected by all who knew him for his integrity and
indefatigable
attention to public business."
"He bitterly
deplored
the false pride which led his friend to conduct so little worthy of the affection that united them."
"Elizabeth was of a calmer and more concentrated disposition; but, with all my
ardour,
I was capable of a more intense application and was more deeply smitten with the thirst for knowledge."
Able to continue for a long time without becoming tired
Feel or express strong disapproval of something
Enthusiasm or passion
Assignment
Compose three questions for discussion on Chapters 1-2, the beginning of the stranger's story. Consider relating your questions to how the novel fits the
Romantic
genre, how characters fit the mould of
Byronic
hero, or how the novel works as a
Gothic
.
1. Who is writing the letters in the beginning of Frankenstein, and to whom is he writing?

2. Why is the letter writer journeying so far from home?/What is his purpose in his quest?
3. What was the first strange sight the letter writer and his crew saw when they were trapped in the ice sheets?
4. What does the letter writer greatly desire, and how does this wish come true?
Chapters 5-6
vocabulary
"At length
lassitude
succeeded to the tumult I had before endured; and I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, endeavoring to seek a few moments of forgetfulness."
"The poor woman was very
vacillating
in her repentance. She sometimes begged Justine to forgive her unkindness, but much oftener accused her of having caused the deaths of her brothers and sister."
physical or mental weariness; lack of energy
alternate or waver between opinions/decisions; indecisive
dialectic journal
From the Text
From Me
From My Classmates
Quotations
Explain the quotes you've chosen, ask questions, pose ideas, etc.
Jot down ideas from class discussion: further ideas, more questions, good quotations, etc.
Chapters 7-8
"Six years had elapsed, passed in a dream but for one
indelible
trace, and I stood in the same place where I had last embraced my father before my departure for Ingolstadt."
Impossible to remove or erase; permanent
Quiz
1. What is Victor's reaction to his creation finally coming to life?
2. Who nurses Victor back to health?
3. When Victor is well again, he receives a letter from Elizabeth. What are two subjects she addresses?
4. How do Victor and his friend spend the summer, and what is Victor's emotional state during this time?
Vocabulary
Assignment
Dialectic Journal #2
Don't forget about the vocabulary quiz on words 1-10 tomorrow!
"I am malicious because I am miserable."
"Shall I respect man when he condemns me?"
"...if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear."
"You, my creator, would tear me to pieces, and triumph; remember that, and tell me why I should pity man more than he pities me?"
7. All people are either
evil
OR
good
. There is no in-between or "gray" area.
Questions
1. How does this chapter support the Romantic idea that technology is not always a good/positive thing?

2. How does Victor display obsessive behavior in the two years he's been in Ingolstadt?

3. Why is exhibiting this unhealthy tunnel vision? What is his ultimate goal?

4. How does Victor's transformation in this chapter further support his role as a Byronic hero?
Chapters 8-9
Vocabulary
...such a declaration would have been considered as the rags of a madman, and would not have
exculpated
her who suffered through me.
Show that someone is not guilty of wrongdoing
...but fear and hatred of the crime of which they supposed her guilty rendered them
timorous
, and unwilling to come forward.
Showing or suffering from nervousness, fear, or lack of confidence
Dear lady, I had none to support me; all looked on me as a wretch doomed to ignominy and
perdition
.
A state of eternal punishment and damnation
Journal
Victor states that William and Justine were "the first hapless victims to my unhallowed arts" (Shelley 73). Victor guesses that his own creation has murdered William and thereby killed Justine. But even if this is true, with whom should the blame for the loss of these innocent lives truly lay, with Victor or his creature? Support your argument with strong evidence.
Chapter 7 Quiz
1. What shocking news does Victor learn just as he is getting ready to leave Ingolstadt?
2. Victor is unable to return home the first night back in Switzerland, so he wanders about in a huge storm, super depressed. Lo and behold, a flash of lightning reveals what standing nearby, in a clump of trees?
3. Who is arrested as the murderer of William?
4. What evidence is found that suggests this person is the culprit for this horrific crime?
A theme repeated across many texts is the effects of guilt on the individual. Explain how the recent events in Frankenstein support the idea that guilt is life-altering. Additionally, make at least one text-to-text connection. Think: which other literary figures find themselves in situations similar to Victor?

- George?
- Hester Prynne?
- John Proctor?
- Macbeth?
- Lady Macbeth?
Chapters 8-9
Journal
Vocabulary
My
abhorrence
of this fiend cannot be conceived.
A feeling of repulsion; disgusted loathing
The weather was fine: it was about the middle of the month of August, nearly two months after the death of Justine; that miserable
epoch
from which I dated all my woe.
a period of time in history or a person's life, typically one marked by notable events or particular characteristics.

Vocabulary
Who can describe their horror and
consternation
on beholding me?
Feelings of anxiety or dismay, especially at something unexpected; distress
But again, when I reflected that they had
spurned
and deserted me, anger returned, a rage of anger...
Abandoned or rejected with disgust or hatred
Suddenly, as I gazed on him, an idea seized me, that this little creature was unprejudiced, and had lived too short a time to have
imbibed
a horror of deformity.
Absorb or assimiilate
I was bound by a solemn promise...if I did, what
manifold
miseries might not impend over me an dmy devoted family?
Many and various
The latter method of obtaining the desired intelligence was
dilatory
and unsatisfactory
Intended to cause delay; slows something down
1. Did Victor do the right thing in destroying the she-creature? Think about all of his reasoning for doing so. Do any of those have weight?
2. Is the Creature a full-fledged monster now? Has he become the wretch and daemon that Victor believed him to always be? And if you think so, was he destined to be monstrous, or did outside forces change him (nature vs. nurture)?
3. Is Victor a monster or a murderer? Or just a guy who has made some mistakes?
4. What do you predict will happen between now (Victor in jail, Creature on the loose and enraged) and where our story began, with Victor chasing the Creature across the ice sheets?
8. Everyone has a pre-determined fate.
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