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Permaculture Flower Pattern Language

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by Adam Brock on 25 August 2013

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Transcript of Permaculture Flower Pattern Language

Earthcare
Peoplecare
Resource Share
Landscape
Catchment
City-Country Fingers
Agricultural
Terrain
Neighborhoods
Water: Source
And Force of Life
Forested Ridges
House Cluster
Living In
The Garden
Woodland
Mosaic
Foraging
Dunbar's number
Tyranny of
Structurelessness
Nemawashi
Cultural Narratives
Third Places
Networks and Hierarchies
Collaborate and Caucus
Sharing
a Meal
The Commons
Fear burns bright
Hope burns long
Arts of
Resistance
Service
Learning
Regenerative
Institutions
The Web of Oppression
Allyship and
Solidarity
Appropriately-scaled
Communities
Placemaking
Genius Loci
Bioregional
Cuisine
Forms of Capital
Ecological
Cultural
Social
Spiritual
Financial
Demmurage
Economic
De-Growth
The Triple
Bottom Line
Economic and
Financial
Relocalization
Worker-owned cooperatives
Hui
Time Banking
Speak to Multiple Intelligences
Nurture critical
thinking
Encourage
Eccentricity
Listening
Session
Think/
Listen
Scavenger Hunt
Community
Commitments
Coppicing
Renewable
Energy
Aquaponics
Chinampas
Keyline
Active Rainwater
Harvesting
Cooling Tunnel
Biochar
Passive Solar
Design
Thermal Mass
Climate
Battery
Garden
Farms
Alley
Cropping
Denver Handmade Homemade Market
Communal
Labor
Roof Catchment
Cisterns
Dendritic Paths
Fencing
Living Fence/
Hedgerow
Windbreak
South-facing outdoors
Outdoor gathering
space
Outdoor kitchen
source: http://www.teachengineering.org/
Shade
Trellis
Ailanthus
Alder
Ash
Black locust
Chestnut
Willow
Passive Rainwater
Harvesting
Ollas
Gabions
Imprinting
Access to Land
Neighborhood-Supported Agriculture
Grazing Services
Conservation
Easements
Guerilla
Gardening
Ram
Pump
Forest
Garden
Perennial Polycultures
Building Soil
Mulch
Compost
Sheet
Mulching
Cover Crops
Browns and Greens
leaves
shredded newspaper
straw
cardboard
vegetable scraps
coffee grounds
grass clippings
(materials high in carbon)
(materials high in nitrogen)
Cool season
N-fixing
Warm season
Non-
N-fixing
Austrian Winter Pea
Fava Bean
Fenugreek
Lupine
Lab Lab Bean
Mustard
Buckwheat
Buffalo Grass
Animals as Tools
Poultry
Tractor
Rotational Grazing
Observe and
Interact
Catch and
Store Energy
Obtain A Yield
Apply Self-Regulation
And Accept Feedback
Use Renewable Resources and Services
Produce no waste
Design from
Patterns to Details
Integrate rather
than segregate
"Biology is the new technology"
Use small and
slow solutions
Use and value diversity
Use edges and
value the marginal
Creatively use and respond to change
Stack functions
Redundance = resilience
Step up/step back
Respect diversity
Energy Descent
The progress narrative
Intention without
expectation
Food Preservation
Dehydration
Pickling
Canning
Fermentation
Rites of Passage
The problem is the solution
Collective Witnessing
Compost heat
Haybox stove
Solar cooker
Solar hot water
Treadle pump
Appropriate
Technology
Cob oven
Hierarchy with consent
Consensus
Bioshelters
Sacred
Economics
http://sacred-economics.com/read-online/
In nature
In culture
Low overhead
Income Polycultures
The process of building community
Forming
Norming
Storming
Performing
The essential nature of a place:
what makes it unique and special
Language
Land and water forms
Crafts and industries
Passive
Active
On a dashboard in the sun
Solar
dehydrator
Mindfulness
Yoga
Professions of Primary Production
Develop skills and livelihoods
based on meeting basic human needs
Food production
Building
Clothing
Repair
Renewable
energy systems
Healthcare
Education
Water harvest
and storage
Design Blitz
Service
Learning
Cleaning
Party
Barnraising/
Gardenraising
Crop harvests usually come in pulses, while people have steady nutritional needs year round. Food preservation allows us to catch and store the energy produced during the harvest season for later enjoyment.
Currency
Catalyst that mediates the flow between elements in a system
One for the money,
Two for the hood
Reducing the need to earn
Sliding scale
Network weavers
Mavens
Cultural
translators
It can be very challenging to form alliances with communities different from your own, even if you live in the same area. Therefore, find and engage community members that have extensive lived experience with both communities.
Nearly every community or subculture has a person that "knows everybody". These people are the network weavers: they have the social skills and enough knowledge of the entire community to create mutually beneficial interconnections between people in a group, making the whole community closer and more effective.
From wikipedia: Nemawashi in Japanese means an informal process of quietly laying the foundation for some proposed change or project, by talking to the people concerned, gathering support and feedback, and so forth. It is considered an important element in any major change, before any formal steps are taken, and successful nemawashi enables changes to be carried out with the consent of all sides.

Nemawashi literally translates as "going around the roots", from (ne, root) and (mawasu, to go around [something]). Its original meaning was literal: digging around the roots of a tree, to prepare it for a transplant.
From wikipedia: Dunbar's number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individual knows who each person is, and how each person relates to every other person. Proponents assert that numbers larger than this generally require more restrictive rules, laws, and enforced norms to maintain a stable, cohesive group. No precise value has been proposed for Dunbar's number. It has been proposed to lie between 100 and 230, with a commonly used value of 150.
Greenhouse
Leaders
in Service
Promotoras
Our contemporary idea of a leader is one of ego and domination. True leaders, however, see themselves as servants of the community, and earn their leadership by taking responsibility for executing the community's wishes. Taoism counsels that a good leader is a lake that rivers can flow into - being willing to receive the input of others and hold them.
Elders
Mentorship and
Apprenticeship
Radicals
Peopleguilds
Radicals are the community members itching for change. Often but not necessarily younger, they have Big Ideas for how society should be and are eager to put them into action. Sometimes their ideas are premature and need refinement, but sometimes they are truly game-changing. Radicals need the support of elders to offer them advice and mentorship, but the elders must have the wisdom to allow radicals to make their own mistakes.
City Repair
Spheres of influence
Conflict Resolution
Establishing
group intimacy
Intimacy through adversity
Intimacy through
"letting loose"
Talisman of Healthy Community
North
East
West
South
Earth
Responsibility
Fire
Power
Air
Communication
Accountability
Water
Trust
Healthy communities can be seen as existing in a dynamic balance between two sets of forces. Along the vertical axis, passion must be balanced with responsibility. Power is earned by making commitments and keeping them. Meanwhile, the horizontal axis represents a balance between communication and trust. When all the members of the group are heard, the group becomes a learning organization, where inquiry is valued over advocacy. All these are bound by the circle of common vision, value and goals.
In any community of scale 3 and up, there will inevitably arise sub-groups, factions, or cliques. These clusters of people may be aligned by age, family ties, ethnic background, politics, mutual interests, or any number of other variables. In all cases, the community at large will only be healthy when there is a balance between social autonomy of these sub-groups and coordination with the other groups. In other words, people need an in-group to feel a sense of kin and identity - but they also need to break outside of that in-group on a regular basis to understand the needs and gifts of others unlike them. In more formal contexts, this takes the guise of
caucuses
of subgroups, which are allowed to deliberate in isolation and come back to the larger group.
A Permaculture Pattern Language
By Adam Brock
wildgreenyonder@gmail.com
Commitment Pruning
In a society where there is so much healing work to be done, it's understandable that many people end up committing to more projects than they can realistically manage. This is OK in short bursts, but if it becomes the norm it usually leads to fatigue and burnout.
Therefore, it is necessary to examine one's capacity and commitments on a regular basis, and "prune" the commitments that one is able to. Some questions for determining which commitments to prune:
Where is my involvement resulting in the least impact?
Which commitments are least in line with PC principles and my own goals?
Which roles can most easily be transferred to other people?
Rocket mass heater
Sheltering Roof
Studies show that both children and adults across cultures feel more secure in a structure with a roof that surrounds the structure; roofs that have living space within its volume, not just under it.
Good example
Bad example
Rooftop Gardens
Because the built environment reduces the use of natural land resources underneath, rooftop gardens are highly encouraged. Interspersed among the sloping roofs, there should be at least one flat, usable outdoor space in each building, more if they will be used. These spaces should be located so that they are easily accessed on the same level as an indoor room or corridor.
Good example
Bad example
French Drains


A trench filled with porous material (with or without piping) that allows water to infiltrate quickly and percolate into root zone of surrounding soil
Terraces
An energy intensive earthwork that creates flat shelves parallel to the contour of a slope
Diversion Swales
A gently sloping drainage way built slightly off-contour allowing water to move slowly down slope across a landscape while also allowing some to infiltrate into the soil
Sunken Bed/Infiltration Basin
A shallow level-bottomed depression dug into the earth to intercept and infiltrate rainfall and runoff
Berm 'n Basin
An earthwork creating a perpendicular net to gently/moderately sloping land to slow, spread and infiltrate water runoff
Arroyo
Dry stream basin that fills with water during times of stormwater runoff. A way to divert water to more needed areas.
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