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Poem Analysis: "The Soote Season"

An interactive presentation of my analysis of "The Soote Season" by Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey.
by Collyn Clark on 13 September 2012

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Transcript of Poem Analysis: "The Soote Season"

THESE LAST THREE LINES DON'T FIT THE HAPPY MOOD OF THE REST OF THE POEM. Suggests he’s DEPRESSED, but he should not be because of the happiness of spring in nature. Snakes, Birds, Bees: he is unhappy about a girl. Perhaps he has lost his lover & is lonely. THE SOOTE SEASON WHAT DO THESE LAST
THREE LINES SUGGEST? BY: HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF SURREY PRESENTATION BY: COLLYN CLARK BACKGROUND INFO: WRITTEN BY HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF SURREY, IN 1557. He is known as one of the "Fathers of the English Sonnets" "THE SOOTE SEASON" is a sonnet, with the rhyme scheme: ababababababaa The soote season, that bud and bloom forth brings,
With green hath clad the hill and eke the vale;
The nightingale with feathers new she sings;
The turtle to her make hath told her tale.
Summer is come, for every spray now springs;
The hart hath hung his old head on the pale;
The buck in brake his winter coat he flings,
The fishes float with new repaired scale;
The adder all her slough away she slings,
The swift swallow pursueth the flies small;
The busy bee her honey now she mings.
Winter is worn, that was the flowers’ bale.
And thus I see among these pleasant things,
Each care decays, and yet my sorrow springs. THE POEM: THE SOOTE SEASON BY HENRY HOWARD, 1557 "THE SOOTE SEASON": LINES 1 & 2: The soote season, that bud and bloom forth brings,

With green hath clad the hill and eke the vale; LINES 3, 4, & 5: LINES 6, 7, & 8: The hart hath hung his old head on the pale;

The buck in brake his winter coat he flings.

The fishes float with new repaired scale; ANALYSIS LINES 9, 10, & 11: The adder all her slough away she slings,

The swift swallow pursueth the flies small;

The busy bee her honey now she mings. LINES 12, 13, & 14: Winter is worn, that was the flowers’ bale.

And thus I see among these pleasant things,

Each care decays, and yet my sorrow springs. DEFINITIONS: SOOTE: adj. sweet CLAD: EKE: also; an addition VALE:
SUMMARY OF LINES 1 & 2: THE SOOTE SEASON= SPRING DEFINITIONS: TURTLE: MAKE: SPRAY: n. turtledove n. mate twigs of trees or shrubs THESE THREE LINES DESCRIBE: The nightingale with feathers new she sings;

The turtle to her make hath told her tale.

Summer is come, for every spray now springs; -NIGHTINGALE SINGING
-TURTLEDOVE AND HER MATE; REFERS TO LOVE DEFINITIONS: HART: BRAKE: PALE: n. a male deer. n. a stake or fence DEFINITIONS: ADDER: SLOUGH: n. a snake n. the outer skin
of a snake v. to pursue, to
follow THE SNAKE MAY REFER TO: PURSUETH: discharges MINGS: -SHEDDING HER SKIN: CONTINUATION OF THE THEME OF REBIRTH & RENEWAL
-EVIL
-ADAM & EVE- SIN THE SWALLOW & THE
BEE MAY REFER TO: -"THE BIRDS AND THE BEES"
-SUGGESTS A SEXUAL OVERTONE TO THE POEM DEFINITIONS: BALE: harm covered; covered with clothes a valley; land lying between two ranges of hills DESCRIPTION OF SPRING:
GREENERY SPRINGING UP, AND COVERING THE HILLS AND THE LAND LYING BETWEEN.
THE DEAD GRASS AND LAND FROM WINTER IS BECOMING RENEWED WITH NEW GROWTH. -GIVES THE POEM A SENSE OF HAPPINESS. SPRING'S POSITIVE IMPACT ON NATURE AND ANIMALS -BRANCHES AND TWIGS ON TREES ARE NOW BLOSSOMING SPRING'S POSITIVE IMPACT ON NATURE AND ANIMALS n. a clump of bushes, or bushwood. THESE THREE LINES DESCRIBE: SPRING'S CHARACTERISTICS OF REBIRTH AND REGROWTH IN NATURE. A BUCK SHEDDING OFF HIS WINTER COAT IN THE BUSHES. FISH SWIMMING IN WATER WITH NEW SCALES. REBIRTH AND REGROWTH THE MALE DEER SHEDDING ITS OLD ANTLERS, AND GROWING NEW ONES. IN CONCLUSION:

-As the world continues to renew and regrow around him, the hope that he has to reunite with his lover degenerates. -The ending couplet provides an ironic twist to the poem.
-Howard confesses that the liveliness of the new season contributes nothing to him, and that although the season is sweet, it cannot fill the empty space inside of him over the loss of his love.
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