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Animal and Plant Domestication in China

Animal and Plant Domestication during the Agricultural Revolution in China
by Miranda Page on 11 January 2013

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Transcript of Animal and Plant Domestication in China

China Gobi Desert Nomads Jungles The Silk Road The Foundations of the Silk Road The High Point of the Silk Road The Decline of The Silk Road The Han Dynasty
206 B.C. - 220 B.C. 206 B.C. 618 A.D. Culture Boom Beginning Animal Domestication
(what they ate) Plant Domestication The Tang Dynasty
618 A.D. - 907 A.D. Rice was not the first plant domesticated in China, although it was one of the first. Rice was first domesticated in the Yangtze River, and Neolithic people in both north and south China may have been harvesting wild rice and initiating rice cultivation that eventually led to domestication. However, the very first plant domesticated in China was foxtail millet. Millet is a small edible seed that can be used to make noodles. They first domesticated millet for the purpose of food for themselves, but after the domestication of rice in 4000 B.C, the people of China did not see using millet as a top priority for feeding themselves. They had all of this millet and rice crops, but they only wanted the rice. 1344 The Qing Dynasty
1344 - 1912 The most important trade route in China What things were traded along the road?
•silk (from China)
•animals
•plants
•furs
•gold
•glass (Rome)
•ceramics
•ideas
-Religion (Buddhism) http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2009/03/25-01.html Due to C4 and C3 readings of millet, scientists were able to tell which animals were beginning to be domesticated. Evidence shows that 7900 years ago, wild pig bones give off a strong C3 level, indicating that they ate weaker grains like grasses, which means they are wild. Yet at the same early date, dog bones were giving off strong C4 levels, indicating that they were fed millet by humans and were domesticated before pigs were. After pigs became domesticated, everything and everyone was eating millet. Two of China's most important animals were able to be domesticated due to the abundance of Millet. All of this suggests that millet domestication as well as pig and dog domestication helped build the Yangshao culture, one of northern China's most important early civilizations. Domestication Timeline 1784 United States begin to trade with China 1843 Port of Shanghai opens for trading Dogs Between 10,000 and 3,000 BC Pigs 9,000 BC Silk Worm 3,000 BC The Silk Road was full of dangers:
-Bandits hid throughout the road
-It was a long journey Chicken 6000 BC Duck 4000 BC The Silk Road connected Eastern China to Rome
It was 7000 miles long
Named the silk road because the Romans wanted silk, which was all the way in China Water Buffalo 4,000 BC Bactrian Camel 2500 BC 0 BC 10000 BC Common Carp 300 BC Gold Fish 500 AD Impacts of the Silk Road
-New goods introduced
-grapes
-walnuts
-carrots
-peppers
-beans
-spinach
-cucumbers
-pomegrantes
•Religion
-Buddhism
•New cultures http://www.travelchinaguide.com/silk-road/culture.htm CHINAAAAAA!!! By Miranda and (mi)Randa Domestication eds. Hawksby, Lester, Christian Humphries, Frances
Adlington. Timetables of History: Over 10,000 events from the Ancient Times to the Present. United States of America: Random House Reference, 2008. 120 & 144. Print. In Research Question:
What plants and animals were domesticated during the agricultural revolution in china and what effect did it have on their society and trade routes? eds. Hawksby, Lester, Christian Humphries, Frances
Adlington. Timetables of History: Over 10,000 events from the Ancient Times to the Present. United States of America: Random House Reference, 2008. 120 & 144. Print. Any Questions? Or are you guys just too smart? Epilogue Works Cited In approaching the group case study, we first decided which route we wanted to go. From there we split up the work. One of us took trade routes and the other took the plants and animals that were domesticated in China. Since we had such little time to create an entire project, we decided to just go for it. We both made Prezi accounts and did what we needed to do for our part of the project. We decided to focus on Innovation and Inequality because we thought that it would apply directly to what we wanted to study about China. We researched our parts of the project and then put it into the presentation. At the end of each period we worked on it, we reviewed what we did and what we had to do. We worked on it each study hall and communicated ideas and thoughts we had. Once we had all of our information, we practiced what we were going to say and how we were going to present until we felt ready to present this project.
In our group, one of us is a Warrior archetype and the other is a Visionary. Together, we believe that we worked well. With the Visionaries ideas and the Warrior's quick decision-making and natural go, go, go style, we accomplished this project with relative ease. When we talked about archetypes in Leadership class, it said that Warriors and Visionaries work well together, which we think is true. We were very good at communicating everything that we needed to and because of that we left a lot of stress that normally accompanies group projects behind. Because of this lack of stress, we not only enhanced our partner communication skills, we learned a lot about china's agricultural past, and had fun while doing it! eds. Hawksby, Lester, Christian Humphries, Frances
Adlington. Timetables of History: Over 10,000 events from the Ancient Times to the Present. United States of America: Random House Reference, 2008. 120 & 144. Print.
Wild, Oliver. "The Silk Road." . N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Nov 2012.
<http://www.ess.uci.edu/~oliver/silk.html
. "Culture of Silk Road." Travel China Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Nov
2012. <http://www.travelchinaguide.com/silk-road/culture.htm>. Conclusion In conclusion, the evidence we gathered says that the geography of China directly affects the culture and the trade routes.
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