Prezi

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in the manual

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Surviving a

No description
by Julia Bourque on 26 August 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Surviving a

Surviving a
New England
Winter

Illness Prevention
Wash hands regularly
Get plenty of sleep
Drink water!
Yale Health Flu Shot Clinics
yalehealth.yale.edu/flu
Protect Your Skin and Lips
Moisturizer (containing shea butter
Lip balm, Chapstick



Neosporin for raw noses
Avoid very hot showers
Frostbite
When exposed to very cold temperatures, skin and underlying tissues may freeze. The areas most likely to be affected by frostbite are your hands, feet, nose and ears.
How can I prevent it?
Protect your skin
Get out of the cold
Gradually warm the area
Get medical help if the area continues to feel numb
Clothing
Function over fashion
Layering
Accessories
Hat, scarf, mittens/gloves, warm socks, boots
Sunglasses
Layering
(And lack thereof...)
Help, I have frostbite
Look for boots that are waterproof and have good treads for walking on ice and snow. Make sure you have enough room for thermal socks.
Winter Travel and Safety
Following the Weather
WFSB (CBS)
WTNH (ABC)
WVIT (NBC)
WTIC (Fox)
www.weather.com
NOAA National Weather Service: www.noaanews.noaa.gov
School Delays and Closings
Snow days vs. delayed openings
Yale closures?
How do I find out?
Driving and Car Care
Driving and Car Care, cont.
Drive with caution
Ice scraper and brush
Pedestrians and cyclists should also be cautious
AAA (American Automobile Association)

"Car Talk" on NPR
http://exchange.aaa.com/safety/roadway-safety/winter-driving-tips/
http://www.cartalk.com/
Winter Fun
Sledding
Divinity School Hill
Edgerton Park
Ice Skating
Where can I rent skates?
Ralph Walker Skating Rink
http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/Parks/ParksInformation/walker.asp
Ingall's Rink (no skate rentals available)
http://www.yalebulldogs.com/information/facilities/ingalls_rink/index
Downhill (Alpine) Skiing
and enjoying!
Ski Sundown:
www.skisundown.com
Mohawk Mountain:
www.mohawkmtn.com
Mt. Southington:
www.mountsouthington.com
Woodbury Ski Area:
www.woodburyskiarea.com

www.skivermont.com
www.skinh.com
www.skimaine.com
VT
NH
ME
Cross-Country (Nordic) Skiing and Snowshoeing
Winding Trails Recreation Association:
www.windingtrails.org
Northwest Park:

www.northwestpark.org
Woodbury Ski Area:
www.woodburyskiarea.com
Connecticut State Parks:
www.ct.gov/dep
The White Memorial Conservation Center:
www.whitememorialcc.org

Indoor Activities
Payne Whitney Gym
Yale’s winter sports teams:
www.yalebulldogs.com
Museums
Yale Center for British Art:
ycba.yale.edu
Yale University Art Gallery:
artgallery.yale.edu
Peabody Museum:
www.peabody.yale.edu
Watch a Movie

New Haven Public Library (free DVD loans):
www.cityofnewhaven.com/library
Netflix (rental DVDs delivered to your door or online streaming):
www.netflix.com
Criterion Cinemas on Temple Street:
http://www.bowtiecinemas.com/location-by-state/connecticut/
The McDougal G&P Winter Ball @ The Omni Hotel

And don't forget... Keep your car windows closed!

OUTER CLOTHING
WARM SOCKS (natural fibers like wool or cotton are good choices)
GLOVES/MITTENS (look for cashmere or Thinsulate lining)
SCARF
WARM HAT and/or EAR MUFFS
WARM WATERPROOF JACKET/COAT (down and Thinsulate are two of the warmest linings)
WARM WATERPROOF BOOTS (look for good grip soles)
 
INNER CLOTHING
TURTLENECKS or LONG-SLEEVE SHIRTS
SWEATERS
FLEECE SHIRTS
FLEECE LINED PLANTS
FLEECE / FLANNEL PAJAMAS
THERMAL/LONG UNDERWEAR/TIGHTS (silk thermal wear is less bulky than cotton)
NOTE: long underwear or “long johns” are unisex, but tights are for women
 
ESSENTIAL ITEMS
CHAPSTICK/LIP BALM (voted #1 essential item)
HAND/BODY LOTION (try Curel, Eucerin or Nivea brands; look for Shea Butter as an ingredient)
FLANNEL BED SHEETS

Winter Essentials
Surviving a New England Winter:
Cold and Flu Care
Haley McCarthy, Health Educator
Student Wellness First Floor, 55 Lock Street
http://yalehealth.yale.edu/studentwellness
Put these numbers in your phone & call first!
Student Health 203-432-0312
Acute Care 203-432-0123
The Common Cold
Main reservoir of viruses is young children
Crowding of children in schools and daycare a key factor in seasonal outbreaks
Seasonal pattern of viruses
Chilling of volunteers in cold studies NOT associated with illness
Two main methods are direct contact and sneeze/cough
Peak of infectivity during days 2 and 3 before symptoms
Hand-washing and minimizing direct physical contact may help
How is the Common Cold Spread?
Wash your hands!
Before touching your eyes, nose, and/or mouth.
Before eating or handling food.
When hands are contaminated after sneezing or coughing.
After using the toilet.
After touching items like doorknobs and handrails.
When your hands are visibly soiled, they should be washed with soap and warm water

In other instances, an alcohol-based handrub (like Purell) can be used
Apply to palm of one hand and rub hands together, covering all surfaces of hands and fingers until hands are dry
Handwashing, continued...
American adults average 2-4 colds/year

Children average 6-8 colds/year

Nearly one billion colds/year in US

Results in over 50 million inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions/year.
24 to 72 hours
Runny nose, congestion, headache, sore throat, cough, sneezing
Fevers more common in children
Rapid onset of symptoms with escalation in first 3 days
Median duration is 7 days
25% of colds last up to 14 days
Smokers may experience increased duration and severity of symptoms because the smoke irritates the mucus membranes
Symptoms
Seasonal outbreaks (Oct – March)
May resemble common cold, but symptoms also include fevers, aches, and lethargy
Dangerous complications in infants, elderly and people with certain chronic diseases (heart, lung, diabetes, HIV)
Similar treatments as common cold
The Flu
How do you treat the flu?
TIME!
Rest
Fluids
Avoid alcohol
Sleep
Stress management
Symptomatic Treatment
Decongestants
Treatment of fever
Fluids
Lozenges, gargles
Chicken soup?
Recommended Over-the-counter (OTC) Medications
What about antibiotics?
Antibiotic Requests
Too busy to get sick
Colds “always” progress to something bad
Previous doctors “always” prescribed antibiotics
Reasons to Avoid Use
They do NOT work for viral illnesses
Side effects/allergic reactions
Development of resistance over time
Viral infections (such as a common cold or influenza) cannot be cured with antibiotics.
http://yalehealth.yale.edu/flu
The End!
http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/
Questions
See the full transcript