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Copy of SGOs It's All About the Journey

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by natalee bartlett on 27 May 2013

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Transcript of Copy of SGOs It's All About the Journey

It's All About the
Student Growth Objectives Student Growth Objectives It's About The Journey... Benchmark Assessment
Purchased Assessment
Teacher Created Assessment First Step is the Assessment General
Performance Band
Departmental
Specific Student Group What type of SGO Will You Write? How Will I Measure Progress? SMART Goals Next on the Journey
Step 2: Determine Student's Starting Points Let's Get Started!

Choose or develop quality assessments as
they determine how much growth students
have demonstrated over the year or course.
You will be using the SGO assessment as a
“pre-test” to establish a baseline or starting point
of each child.
SGO’s should be appropriately rigorous for grade
level and course If there is no common test for a subject and grade level, developing such an assessment can be a valuable way to use professional development time.
If you teach a “stand alone” course (e.g., Careers) you may still be able to work with your colleagues on developing high quality questions, or on the structure of the test. Creating an Assessment
If there is no common test for a subject and grade level, developing such an assessment can be a valuable way to use professional development time.
If you teach a “stand alone” course (e.g., Careers) you may still be able to work with your colleagues on developing high quality questions, or on the structure of the test. Suggested Guidelines for Assessment Creation
Develop assessments collaboratively
Align all assessments with NJCCCS or CCSS
Align all assessments with district, school and
department goals.
Make sure all the content in your SGO is covered in the assessment.
Incorporate test items that vary in levels of difficulty. Suggested Guidelines for Assessment Creations
Develop assessments collaboratively
Align all assessments with NJCCCS or CCSS
Align all assessments with district, school and department goals.
Make sure all the content in your SGO is covered in the assessment.
Incorporate test items that vary in levels of difficulty. Include a sufficient number of test items to ensure rigor.
Collaboratively determine possible modifications to meet the needs of students.
Develop rubrics to assess essay responses
Make sure content and skill-based rubrics are specific and address multiple levels of proficiency Will I use the same assessment, or a modification of it, as a pre-test?
If the assessment is used as a pre-test, how does it gauge my students’ level of
pre-required knowledge and skills for the course I am about to teach them?
Does my assessment measure depth of understanding and are there questions that would challenge even my most knowledgeable students? Even though students may walk through the door on the first day of school at very different points of preparedness, all learners are capable of growing.
A key to measuring the gains they make throughout the year is having an accurate picture of where these students start out.
An important component of the SGO process is to collect evidence on what students already know and understand and the types of skills they already possess. Remember: Comparing starting points to end points for students provides a way to objectively demonstrate and be recognized for how successfully you help students to grow during the year! Recognition for Being Successful How alike should these assessments be?
Do I have a carefully controlled testing environment in which copies of the pre-assessment will remain secure?
How many questions is it appropriate to put on a pre-assessment to which students may not currently know the answer but should by the end of the course?
To what degree should the assessment be built on standards assessed in previous grades or subjects? Questions to Consider When Using a Pre-Assessment that Is Similar to the Post-Assessment Breaking Down SGOs Into Different Levels
Based on Student Preparedness
Teachers often have students with a wide range of preparedness and ability in a course or class.
One simple SGO for all students might be too low for some students and too high for others.
By breaking down SGOs into different levels based on student preparation, your goals are more likely to be ambitious and feasible for a much wider range of students. Low level of preparedness: Students who have yet to master pre-requisite knowledge or skills needed for this course
Medium level of preparedness: Students who are appropriately prepared to meet the demands of the course
High level of preparedness: Students who start the course having already mastered some key knowledge or skills. One Way Would Be to Divide Students Into Three Groups What sources of student data are available to you?
Is a pre-assessment something you should be using?
Choose 1-3 sources of data to determine starting points.
Gather achievement data on all of your students.
Complete the Identify and Approve Starting Points form
Determine whether you should subdivide your students
for the purposes of the SGO according to the achievement data. Initial Questions to Consider
When Determining Students’ Starting Points SGOs must be specific and measurable and be based on student growth and/or achievement.
Developing a quality goal is highly dependent on your expert knowledge of your students and assessments, and the professional collaboration that occurs between you and your evaluator.
SGOs can be general or specific. Step Three: Set Ambitious and Achievable
Student Growth Objectives Creating An Assessment What style assessment will best measure student growth in relation to my SGO?
What assessments do I have now that I might be able to use?
What resources are available to find or create an assessment?
How much time do my colleagues and I have to develop or choose an assessment? How alike should these assessments be?
Do I have a carefully controlled testing environment in which copies of the pre-assessment
will remain secure?
How many questions is it appropriate to put on a pre-assessment to which students may not currently know the answer but should by the end of the course?
To what degree should the assessment be built on standards assessed in previous grades or subjects? Questions to Consider When Using a Pre-Assessment
that Is Similar to the Post-Assessment The SGO Process Choose or develop a
quality assessment aligned
to state standards By Feb. 15th Step 2 By Nov. 15th Adjustments to SGOs
can be made with approval Teachers, supervisors meet to discuss
SGOs and other measures Step 5 September Determine students'
starting points Step 1 Step 3 Set ambitious and feasible student growth objectives Teachers, supervisors meet
to discuss and set SGO
with Principal's approval Step 4
Track progress, refine instruction Review results and score By End of School Year What sources of student data are available to you?
Is a pre-assessment something you should be using?
Choose 1-3 sources of data to determine starting points.
Gather achievement data on all of your students.
Complete the Identify and Approve Starting Points form
Determine whether you should subdivide your students for the purposes of the SGO according to the achievement data. Initial Questions to Consider When Determining Students’ Starting Points There are two strategies to consider when setting a General SGO; simple and tiered.
The simple method is based on determining how many of the total students are expected to meet a single target
The tiered method is based on expected growth within groups of students identified by their starting points, as discussed in SGO Step 2. (This is a part of the General SGO and should not be confused with a Specific SGO) General Student Growth Objectives To use the simple method of setting General SGOs, educators must predict what percentage of students would attain a particular level of performance on the final assessment.
There are four levels of attainment of this objective. Simple General SGOs require less analysis of students’ starting points.
The goal is also straightforward – x students will meet y level of proficiency.
However, tiered General SGOs provide rich data that can be used to differentiate instruction more effectively.
Tiered General SGOs allow for setting goals that are appropriate for a wider range of students. Setting Simple Student Growth Objectives Tiered Student Growth Objectives vs. Simple General SGOs
In Tiered SGOs you set different targets for different groups of students according to their starting points.

Quantifying what each level looks like provides a clear idea of
how much growth to expect from each of these groups. Determine the score on the final assessment (or portfolio) that you will set one of your SGOs towards.
If using an assessment in which proficiency levels can be compared one year to the next, determine the change in proficiency levels towards which you will set your objective
Decide whether to set tiered objectives based on groupings
of your students. Key Steps for Writing SGOs Determine what “full attainment” of your SGO would look like based on target scores or growth in proficiency.
Create brackets for other levels of attainment.
Complete your SGO form and conference with your supervisor.
Repeat for a second SGO if necessary More Key Steps for Writing SGOs The value of goal-setting becomes apparent when educators track progress towards these goals and can then make adjustments to stay on track.
In the classroom, tracking goals means monitoring student performance through some sort of assessment.
These assessments could be benchmark assessments that are already in place or they could also be the components in a portfolio. SGO Step 4: Track Progress and Refine Instruction The value of goal-setting becomes apparent when educators track progress towards these goals and can then make adjustments to stay on track.
In the classroom, tracking goals means monitoring student performance through some sort of assessment.
These assessments could be benchmark assessments that are already in place or they could also be the components in a portfolio. SGO Step 4: Track Progress and Refine Instruction During the middle of the school year, you and your evaluator will check-in to evaluate the progress your students are making towards the targets you have set for them.
Reflecting on:
-How are your students progressing toward your SGOs?
-How do you know?
-Which students are struggling/exceeding expectations?
-What are you doing to support them?
-What additional resources do you need to support you as you
work to achieve your SGOs? Mid-Year Check-up A teacher’s supervisor and/or a member of the
School Improvement Panel will calculate a rating
for the SGOs

At the end of the school year you will compile the
results of the assessment(s) used for SGOs and
your evaluator will use them to formulate a rating. SGO Step 5: Review Results and Score Measures of Student Growth Choose or develop quality assessments as they determine how much growth students have demonstrated over the year or course.

You will be using the SGO assessment as a “pre-test” to establish a baseline or starting point of each child.

SGO’s should be appropriately rigorous for grade level and course When the SGO process is carried out diligently, the information that SGOs provide will be valuable to improving teaching practices.
Information can be used to develop well thought-out instructional plans for the following year
Might use results to inform your professional development plan choosing to focus on areas of challenge Using Student Growth Objectives to Improve Practice and Student Learning “For many teachers and principals. SGOs will require a shift in thinking about assessment, goal setting, and instruction. However, when created and used thoughtfully, SGOs offer a powerful tool that will not only help improve instructional practice, but ultimately, and most importantly, student learning.”
New Jersey State Board of Education, 2013 First Steps If there is no common test for a subject and grade level, developing such an assessment can be a valuable way to use professional development time.

If you teach a “stand alone” course (e.g., Careers) you may still be able to work with your colleagues on developing high quality questions, or on the structure of the test. Creating an Assessment In order to develop a scoring guide based on how well you meet your SGO, determine the following:
a target score on the final assessment that indicates considerable learning
the number of students that could reasonably meet this mark
the percentage of students in the course that this represents
a 10-15 percent range around this number Setting the Standard for “Full Attainment” of the Student Growth Objective Simple General SGOs require less analysis of students’ starting points.
The goal is also straightforward – x students will meet y level of proficiency.
However, tiered General SGOs provide rich data that can be used to differentiate instruction more effectively.
Tiered General SGOs allow for setting goals that are appropriate for a wider range of students. Tiered Student Growth Objectives vs. Simple General SGOs General SGO: 6th Grade Music Specific Goal: Targeted Students (8th Grade ELA) Tiered General SGO: Physics 1 For some teachers, it might make most sense to tier student goals based off of readiness levels. In the previous example, in order to reach a final score the evaluator can take a straight (or weighted) average of the student results in each group. Tiered General SGO: Physics 1 Once a range is established for “full attainment” subtracting 10-15 percent from the lower range of “full attainment” will produce the “partial attainment” category.
Any number below this range is the
“insufficient attainment” category.
Above the high end of the
“full attainment” range is the
“exceptional attainment” range. Setting Other Standards of Attainment You may use an assessment method in which the same target score is not appropriate for everyone in the class
An objective may be to have all students increase one proficiency level in reading as measured by the DRA assessment.
You would still go about setting attainment levels in the same way as described. Using Changes in Proficiency Level
Once the SGO is determined, educators will complete a form to record this information.

This form will include information about the standards that he objective captures, the assessment method and the baseline data used to determine students’ starting points. Completing a Student Growth Objective Form
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