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Dweck’s Theory of Motivation

According to Dweck, individuals can be placed on a continuum according to their implicit views of where ability comes from.
by becky navarre on 2 March 2011

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Transcript of Dweck’s Theory of Motivation

Dweck’s Theory of Motivation Carol S. Dweck (born October 17, 1946) is a professor at Stanford University and a social psychologist. She graduated from Barnard College in 1967 and earned a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1972. She taught at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the University of Illinois before joining the Stanford faculty in 2004. Malleable Intelligence Theory
or
Incremental Theory of Intelligence
History Social Cognitive Theory stemmed out of work in the area of social learning theory proposed by N.E. Miller and J. Dollard in 1941. Albert Bandura's expanded social learning theory soon became known as social cognitive theory.
Attribution theory is an influential contemporary social psychology theory developed by:

Fritz Heider-It incorporates behavior modification in the sense that it emphasizes the idea that learners are strongly motivated by the pleasant outcome of being able to feel good about themselves. It incorporates cognitive theory and self-efficacy theory in the sense that it emphasizes that learners' current self-perceptions will strongly influence the ways in which they will interpret the success or failure of their current efforts and hence their future tendency to perform these same behaviors. The theory explores how individuals "attribute" causes to events and behavior. According to Dweck, individuals can be placed on a continuum according
to their implicit views of where ability comes from. Some believe their success is based on innate ability; these are said to have a "fixed" theory of intelligence. Others, who believe their success is based on hard work and learning, are said to have a "growth" or an "incremental" theory of intelligence. Students’ implicit theories of ability may differentially influence their selfregulatory strategies. Dweck has developed a highly influential theory of student motivation building on these and others notably on the ‘attribution theory’ – How we attribute for our failures and successes. The Attribution Theory incorporates behavior modification in the sense that it emphasizes the idea that learners are strongly motivated by the pleasant outcome of being able to feel good about themselves.
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