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Frigg: Norse Goddess

presentation for Goddess Traditions class
by Anna Miles on 20 November 2012

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Transcript of Frigg: Norse Goddess

FRIGG: NORSE GODDESS Norse Religion: An Introduction Poetic and Prose Eddas
written by Snorri Sturluson around 1200 A.D. Yggdrasil - the Tree of Life
nine worlds
Asgard and Hel
Creation - Ymir and Audmula Odin = father of the gods
Frigg = wife of Odin
Fensalir and other homes Who is Frigg? Norse tradition arose out of Germanic tradition
movement from Germanic areas to new settlements Ragnarok - the end times
cyclical experience
begins with the death of Balder Many Names Frigg, Frigga, Frija, Frea, Fria
Jord - Fjorgyn/Earth/mother of Thor
Erce - the mother of Earth
verb - frja/to love/beloved
Earth Mother
Hlin - during Ragnarok only
Wode, Eastre (Ostara), Frau Holle, Holda, Huldra, Vrou-Elde, Frau Gode, Brechte, Bertha
Fulla, Gna, Hlin Many Roles mother
wife - marriage/maternity
earth, fertility, child-bearing
queen of the Aesir and Asyniur
sky, prophecy, magic skills, destiny, shape-changing (falcon skin)
housewives, children, hearth, protection, weaving and spinning Goddess of the North Lynda B. Welch Thesis Frigg represents, through the evolution of her character and mythology, the devolution of the one great Earth Goddess from Nordic and Germanic religious tradition into multiple forms and can be contrasted to similar devolution and evolutions of "great" goddess traditions. Myths about Frigg Fun Frigg Facts origin of the word Friday
sacred day is Friday
spindle and keys are sacred - kept on girdle
uses child helpers to water the earth
Orion's belt was Frigg's Spinning Wheel
sits in Hildskialf Balder's and Odin's deaths
wisdom test with Vafthrudnir
noble foster parents
Longobards (Winnilers) and the Vandals
adultress during Odinsleep aspects = names singular => fragmented movement of patriarchal Christianity
war-like nomadic tribes
three attendants - Fulla, Gna, and Hlin
the old germanic names
confusion by scholars
veneration of goddesses by different social groups Sturluson - Daughter, Mother, Grandmother
Freyja, Frigg, Fjorgyn
nine worlds, Yggdrasil, "the big world" Mother Daughter Grandmother Valknut: three interwoven triangles Questions for you: In Conclusion Norse Today German Neopaganism
1970s
Asatru - religion of the Aesir
Iceland 1. In regards to Welch's theory of the one goddess that broke into many parts and was lost, how might this be seen as the opposite of a goddess tradition we have learned in this class?
2. What do Welch's triangle and the valknut remind you of?
3. Today I discussed the devolution of the singular Earth goddess into Frigg and many other smaller deities. What changes to the Earth goddess do you think might result from Asatru-Neopaganism? To expand, we notice the valknut and triangle as important imagery that is linked to other traditions we have studied. How does the video portray the influence of Eastern religions on the modern Asatru practice? Again how might this change the Earth goddess? Connections to Today's Reading Manifestation of the Goddess
appeared to Lynda Welch in a dream
pg. 242 - timing
pg. 245 - profound response
pg. 239 appeared with Odin as humble woman to become foster parent
pg. 253 - bestowing bliss Bibliography Munch, Peter A. Norse Mythology: Legends of Gods and Heroes. Edited by Magnus Olsen. Translated by Sighurd Bernhard Hustvedt. New York: The American-Scandinavian Foundation, 1926.
Welch, Lynda C. Goddess of the North: a comprehensive exploration of the Norse goddesses, from antiquity to the modern age. York Beach, Maine: Weiser Books, Inc., 2001.
Wood, Juliette. "The concept of the Goddess." In The Concept of the Goddess, edited by Sandra Billington and Miranda Green, 8-25. New York and London: Routledge, 1996. Davidson, H.R. Ellis. Gods and Myths of Northern Europe. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books, Ltd., 1964.
DuBois, Thomas A. Nordic Religions in the Viking Age. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999.
Frigg - The Goddess Queen. http://norse-mythology.com/Frigg.html (accessed March 22, 2012).
Grundy, Stephan. "Freyja and Frigg." In The Concept of the Goddess, edited by Sandra Billington and Miranda Green, 56-67. New York and London: Routledge, 1996.
Hollander, Lee M., trans. The Poetic Edda. Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press, 1962. Frigg represents, through the evolution of her character and mythology, the devolution of the one great Earth Goddess from Nordic and Germanic religious tradition into multiple forms and can be contrasted to similar devolution and evolutions of "great" goddess traditions.
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