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Copy of Albert Einstein

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by Yang Lem on 7 March 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein A revolutionary genius of the modern world Quick Facts of Einstein Aside from his theorems and formulae, did Einstein pursue anything else in his laboratory? In November, 1915, Einstein completed the general theory of relativity, which he considered his masterpiece. He was convinced that general relativity was correct because of its mathematical beauty and because it accurately predicted the perihelion of Mercury's orbit around the sun, which fell short in Newton’s theory. General relativity theory also predicted a measurable deflection of light around the sun when a planet or another sun oribited near the sun. That prediction was confirmed in observations by British astronomer Sir Arthur Eddington during the solar eclipse of 1919. In 1921, Albert Einstein received word that he had received the Nobel Prize for Physics. Because relativity was still considered controversial, Einstein received the award for his explanation of the photoelectric effect. In the 1920s, Einstein launched the new science of cosmology. His equations predicted that the universe is dynamic, ever expanding or contracting. This contradicted the prevailing view that the universe was static, a view that Einstein held earlier and was a guiding factor in his development of the general theory of relativity. But his later calculations in the general theory indicated that the universe could be expanding or contracting. In 1929, astronomer Edwin Hubble found that the universe was indeed expanding, thereby confirming Einstein's work. In 1930, during a visit to the Mount Wilson Observatory near Los Angeles, Einstein met with Hubble and declared the cosmological constant, his original theory of the static size and shape of the universe, to be his "greatest blunder."

Schooling Albert wasn't a particularly warm and fuzzy guy, then? Albert Einstein’s abroad Travels OCCUPATION: Physicist
BIRTH DATE March 14, 1879
DEATH DATE: April 18, 1955
EDUCATION: Luitpold Gymnasium, Eidgenssische Polytechnische Schule (Swiss Federal Polytechnic School) Born in Ulm, Wrttemberg, Germany in 1879, Albert Einstein developed the special and general theories of relativity. In 1921, he won the Nobel Prize for physics for his explanation of the photoelectric effect. Einstein is generally considered the most influential physicist of the 20th century. He died on April 18, 1955, in Princeton, New Jersey. Is it true that Einstein failed math class as a primary-school student? Einstein attended elementary school at the Luitpold Gymnasium in Munich. He enjoyed classical music and played the violin. In 1889, the Einstein family invited a poor Polish medical student, Max Talmud to come to their house for Thursday evening meals. Talmud became an informal tutor to young Albert, introducing him to higher mathematics and philosophy. Einstein visited New York City for the first time on 2 April 1921, where he received an official welcome by the mayor.
To Washington, he accompanied representatives of the National Academy of Science on a visit to the White House.
In 1922, he traveled throughout Asia as part of a six-month excursion and speaking tour. His travels included Singapore, Ceylon, and Japan, where he gave a series of lectures to thousands of Japanese.
He visited Palestine for 12 days in what would become his only visit to that region.
Born: March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany Musical Interest as child Albert Einstein grew up in a secular, middle-class Jewish family.His father, Hermann Einstein, was a salesman and engineer.His mother, the former Pauline Koch, ran the family household.Einstein had one sister, Maja, born two years after him.

Einstein wrote about two events that had a marked effect on his childhood. One was an encounter with a compass at age five, where he marveled at the invisible forces that turned the needle. The other was at age 12, when he discovered a book of geometry which he read over and over.
Early Work of Albert Einstein

Einstein began to wonder what a light beam would look like if you could run alongside it at the same speed. If light were a wave, then the light beam should appear stationary, like a frozen wave. Yet, in reality, the light beam is moving. This paradox led him to write his first "scientific paper" at age 16, "The Investigation of the State of Aether in Magnetic Fields." This question of the relative speed to the stationary observer and the observer moving with the light was a question that would dominate his thinking for the next 10 years. Marriage and Family life of Albert Einstein

Einstein met his future wife, Mileva Maric, a fellow physics student from Serbia,but his parents vehemently opposed the relationship citing her Serbian background and Eastern Orthodox Christian religion. Einstein defied his parents and continued to see Maric And finally married her on Jan. 6, 1903. In May, 1904 they had their first son, Hans Albert. Their second son, Eduard, were born in 1910. Miracle Year of Albert Einstein In 1905—often called Einstein's "miracle year"—he submitted a paper for his doctorate and had four papers published in the Annalen der Physik, one of the best known physics journals. The four papers—the photoelectric effect, Brownian motion, special relativity, and the equivalence of matter and energy—would alter the course of modern physics and bring him to the attention of the academic world. In his paper on matter and energy, Einstein deduced the well-known equation E=mc2, suggesting that tiny particles of matter could be converted into huge amounts of energy, foreshadowing the development of nuclear power. Theory of Relativity This "fact" has circulated for many decades, presumably as encouragement to those of us who actually did struggle with long division. In 1935, a Princeton rabbi showed Albert Einstein a Ripley's Believe It or Not! column that included the anecdote.Einstein laughed and claimed that he'd been at the top of his class, even in primary school. "Before I was fifteen," he added, "I had mastered differential and integral calculus." Albert Einstein Famous Quotes Did Einstein show any signs of future
greatness as an infant? His first impression wasn't one of fame, no. Born in Ulm, Germany, on March 14, 1879, Albert was the first child of Pauline and Hermann Einstein. And to say the couple was less than impressed with their newborn son would be an understatement; they thought his head was grotesquely oversized. His parents described Albert to the delivering physician as a "monstrosity." The doctor convinced them that all infant heads appeared larger than normal and that Albert's body would grow to become more proportionate to his cranium. Of course, once that happened, his grandmother clucked over him and complained to his parents that the boy was "much too fat!" Was Einstein really a slow learner? Did Einstein suffer from a neurological disorder?

Einstein's primary-school teachers reported that the child had a powerful and lingering distaste of authority. Coupled with his late-developing speech, some medical professionals have suggested this behavior as symptomatic of either autism or Asperger's Syndrome. Throughout his childhood and adult life, however, Albert did not exhibit any other behavior that would have been typical of such a diagnosis. He had no difficulty communicating with others, for example. He also demonstrated the emotional capacity to develop both close friendships and passionate relationships. Bertrand Russell Was Albert strictly business, or did he enjoy a hearty laugh now and again? Did Einstein have any hobbies? What was Einstein's involvement with the Manhattan Project?

His only direct participation in developing the atomic bomb was to solve a theoretical problem posed to him by the bomb's developers, who requested his input on their key task of using gaseous diffusion to separate fissionable material. Einstein did write a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, however, to encourage him to accelerate the development of such a bomb. Albert believed that the Nazis (who were responsible for his hasty emigration to the U.S.) were on the brink of unleashing their own nuclear weaponry.
Did the man own a comb, for heaven's sake?

Yes, but his mind was so busy with other things that he regularly forgot to use it. Einstein's overall neglect of personal appearance began shortly after the birth of his first son, Hans.On an almost daily basis, as he made his way to work at the Swiss Patent Office, he would see his reflection in store windows and realize "I forgot to comb my hair again."In later life, Einstein's attitude was obvious. "Long hair minimizes the need for barbers." Was he a snappy dresser? Not so much. As a child, Einstein noted that his big toe would eventually poke a hole in every sock he wore. "Why bother?" the genius thought. He only "dressed up" when it was absolutely necessary.
Albert's typical head-to-toe attire consisted of an undershirt, baggy pants held up with a rope, and sandals. His attitude was either people knew and accepted him, or they didn't. Case closed.
What's the deal with that
tongue picture? When light strikes metal, electrons are emitted Albert Einstein’s Academic career

•On 30 April 1905, Einstein completed his thesis, "A New Determination of Molecular Dimensions". He was awarded a PhD by the University of Zurich.

•The same year four ground breaking papers, on the photoelectric effect, Brownian motion, special relativity, and the equivalence of mass and energy were published.
•By 1908, he was recognized as a leading scientist, and he was appointed lecturer at the University of Bern.
•The following year, he quit the patent office and the lectureship to take the position of physics docent at the University of Zurich.
•In 1911,he became a full professor at Karl-Ferdinand University in Prague.
•In 1914, he returned to Germany after being appointed director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics (1914–1932) and a professor at the Humboldt University of Berlin
•In 1916, Einstein was appointed president of the German Physical Society (1916–1918).
•In 1921, Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his explanation of the photoelectric effect, as relativity was considered still somewhat controversial.
•He also received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society in 1925.
Albert Einstein Emigration to U.S. In February 1933 while on a visit to the United States, Einstein decided not to return to Germany. He undertook his third two-month visiting professorship at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. In October 1933 he took up a position at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey, and in 1935 he arrived at the decision to remain permanently in the United States and apply for citizenship.

Legacy Established the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Refused presidency of Israel
"I know a little of science, but nothing of men.”
Died on April 18, 1955
Albert Einstein becomes U.S. citizen
Albert Einstein dies at 76 On 17 April 1955, Albert Einstein experienced internal bleeding caused by the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which had previously been reinforced surgically by Dr. Rudolph Nissen in 1948. Einstein refused surgery, saying: "I want to go when I want. It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share, it is time to go. I will do it elegantly." He died in Princeton Hospital early the next morning at the age of 76, having continued to work until near the end. Einstein's remains were cremated and his ashes were scattered at an undisclosed location. Albert Einstein’s Political and religious views

Albert Einstein's political view was in favor of socialism; his political views emerged publicly in the middle of the 20th century due to his fame and reputation for genius. Einstein offered to and was called on to give judgments and opinions on matters often unrelated to theoretical physics or mathematics.
Einstein's views about religious belief have been collected from interviews and original writings. These views covered Judaism, theological determinism, agnosticism, and humanism. He also wrote much about ethical culture, opting for Spinoza's god over belief in a personal god.
Family of Albert Einstein Young Albert Encounter With Science 1.The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it.

2.Any man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves.

3. Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.

4.When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity.

5. Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.

6. It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer.
Yes and no. The youngster didn't start to speak until he was two years old, but when he did chatter, he skipped all that "mama, dada" bunk and started off using full sentences. In 1881, Albert's parents presented him with a new little sister, Maria (called "Maja" by family and friends). When two-year-old Albert saw her for the first time, he presumed that she was some sort of toy, and asked "Where does it have its small wheels?" Despite his original skepticism, Maja and Albert soon became best friends. In a scenario fitting for a genius, love first bloomed for Albert in the physics lab at the Swiss Polytechnic School in 1901. There, he quickly attached himself to Mileva Maric, a brilliant young Serbian girl who was the only female physics student at the institute at that time. Soon, the two were inseparable. It doesn't seem so, based on a cache of letters and other papers he bequeathed to Hebrew University. He did marry Mileva in 1903, but continued to have extramarital dalliances throughout their time together. While the couple went on to have two sons, their relationship was a tenuous one. Eventually, Albert drew up a "contract" that required Mileva to keep his clothes and study clean, prepare and serve his meals, and renounce all personal relations with him. He openly discussed his various liaisons with other family members and confided that of all the "dames" he frequented, he liked the "decent, discreet, and harmless" ones best. Einstein was known to have a downright bawdy sense of humor, and he enjoyed teasing his wife. While entertaining a group of esteemed and intellectual guests, he'd purposely try to shock Mileva by launching into a risqu© story. This would prompt her to cut him off with a sharp "Albert!" followed by a coquettish giggle. He also treasured a gag gift given to him by an engraver friend "“ a tin nameplate inscribed Albert Ritter von Steissbein, which roughly translates to "Albert, Knight of the Backside." Einstein proudly affixed the tag to the door of his apartment. Albert Einstein worked in the Swiss Patent Office from 1902 until 1909. He studied for his doctorate degree during those years, and also published several scientific papers in his spare time. One of these demonstrated how radiation converts mass to energy: the Theory of Special Relativity. Einstein's years in the patent office resulted in a lifelong interest in inventions. He enjoyed tinkering with electronics, which led to a few patents of his own, including one for a noiseless refrigerator and another for a transistorized hearing aid. The photograph in question was taken on his 72nd birthday — March 14, 1951. Einstein was leaving an event held in his honor at Princeton University, and got into the back seat of a car along with Dr. Frank Aydelotte, the former head of the Institute for Advanced Study. The paparazzi were coaxing Mr. Einstein through the car windows to "smile for camera" for the umpteenth time that day. A weary Albert responded by sticking out his tongue. UPI shutterbug Arthur Sasse snapped the iconic image, which originally included the faces of Dr. and Mrs. Aydelotte in the car as well. The classic photo was cropped to its current format by none other than Einstein himself, who liked it so much that he sent his friends greeting cards decorated with the image. Albert Einstein’s Love of music Einstein loved Mozart's music, and played Beethoven's violin sonatas. He added that "Love is a better teacher than a sense of duty." He also played for chamber music, and he performed for private audiences and friends. Chamber music also became a regular part of his social life while living in Bern, Zurich, and Berlin, where he played with Max Planck and his son. Albert Einstein’s Popular culture influence Einstein has been the subject of or inspiration for many novels, films, plays, and works of music. He is a favorite model for depictions of mad scientists and absent-minded professors; his expressive face and distinctive hairstyle have been widely copied and exaggerated. Time magazine's Frederic Golden wrote that Einstein was "a cartoonist's dream come true". Albert Einstein’s
Notable awards:


• Nobel Prize in Physics (1921)
• Matteucci Medal (1921)
• Copley Medal (1925)
• Max Planck Medal (1929)
• Time Person of the Century (1999)
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