Prezi

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in the manual

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Science Fiction: Microcosm of Humanity

A persuasive Prezi about why you should read science fiction
by Katherine Tucker on 17 April 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Science Fiction: Microcosm of Humanity

Science Fiction:
Microcosm of Humanity By Kate Tucker Science Fiction (SF) is all about spaceships and aliens, right? SO WRONG! So what is SF? stories of travel through space stories of travel through time stories of imaginary technology BUT every voyage reflects humanity
back with myriad possibilities. It is a literature of CHANGE and it asks YOU, the reader, to participate and "Ask the next question." (1) (2) This cycle ensures a perpetually replenishing need to engage the world with intelligent imagination. SF is unique: it is "the literature not just about individual people and their adventures
but of the human species as a whole:
SF is about how we have changed, how external change affects us, how things we do change the world around us, and how we will continue
to change over time" By imagining technologies
that are microscopic Humanity can better contextualize itself (3) 1516 Thomas More, Utopia
1600 Johannes Kepler, Somnium
1726 Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels
1818 Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
1835 Edgar Allan Poe, ‘The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall’
1864 Jules Verne, Journey to the Centre of the Earth
1895 H.G. Wells, The Time Machine
1912 Edgar Rice Burroughs, Under the Moons of Mars
1915 Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herland
1926 Hugo Gernsback, first issue of "Amazing Stories: The Magazine of Scientification"
1926 Fritz Lang, Metropolis (film)
1932 Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
1937 Olaf Stapledon, Star Maker
1938 C.S. Lewis, Out of the Silent Planet
1941 Isaac Asimov, ‘Nightfall’
1949 George Orwell, 1984
1953 Arthur C. Clarke, 'The Nine Billion Names of God'
1953 Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
1962 Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange
1963 First episode of Dr. Who broadcast (TV)
1965 Frank Herbert, Dune
1966 First Star Trek series broadcast (TV)
1968 Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
1968 Stanley Kubrick, 2001: A Space Odyssey (film)
1969 Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness
1973 Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow
1977 George Lucas, Star Wars (film)
1982 Ridley Scott, Blade Runner (film)
1984 William Gibson, Neuromancer
1985 Margaret Atwood, A Handmaid’s Tale
1985 Orson Scott Card, Ender’s Game
1989 Dan Simmons, Hyperion
1992 Kim Stanley Robinson, Red Mars
1999 The Wachowski Brothers, The Matrix (film)
2005 Steven Spielberg, War of the Worlds (film)
2009 James Cameron, Avatar (film) A Brief and Selective History of SF You could write a whole book about the argument over the official origin of SF, but here are a few of the main contenders: Frankenstein, Utopia, Poe Adam Roberts identifies the beginning of modern SF as a moment in 1600 when a man named Giordano Bruno burned at the stake for merely suggesting that “the universe was infinite and contained innumerable worlds” Here’s a theory I like: This was an earth-shattering idea to the Catholic Church because it suggested that either multiple Christs existed on multiple planets (and had died and been redeemed multiple times, stripping Christ of his novelty), or God had cruelly denied salvation to the rest of the populated cosmos. (5) While this was a despicable concept to Catholics, “to a Protestant imagination...the cosmos expands before the probing inquiries of empirical science.” (6) From there, the genre developed with this ideological dialectic in mind: Hard SF kept to the Catholic strain of thinking and concentrated on scientific accuracy while Soft SF developed from the Protestant perspective of mystical/magical possibilities. These ideas are not mutually exclusive but
rather the combination of creates a fiction that wrestles with itself constantly, ever pushing the boundaries outwards. science & mysticism (7) books readers ideas or gigantic What about SF movies
and television series? In the 20th Century, SF became increasingly more
in film as well as on television. This step into the visual realm allowed classic SF narratives to be made into films that in turn created new perceptions, for better or for worse, of the genre. available mainstream and There are some wondeful SF classics, but oftentimes special effects take the front seat. Sometimes interesting new perspectives or additions to the story are added through visual media: "a single concept, and single novel, like Frank Herbert's Dune (1965) can become, by century's end, a dozen novels, a cinema film, two TV serials, video games, comics, artwork by a dozen artists." The visual realm is just another stage where SF can grow Things to Remember:
SF is about "Asking the Next Question" SF is a catalyst for thought SF is about YOU and ME SF is about changing the boundaries of thought SF comes in so many varieties SF is always changing Fiction can run free; because there are no rules there is no limit to what SF can do! Get Started http://classics.jameswallaceharris.com/
SF Classics Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America SF Poetry http://www2.ku.edu/~sfcenter/other.htm Exhaustive List of SF Weblinks AND Check out the novels
on the timeline--They're
some of my favorites! OK, so there's a long history. But what can Science Fiction DO besides space and lasers? James Gunn, who has taught numerous courses on SF, lists the many topics that can be taught through Science Fiction: "all the social and physical sciences, history, ideas, futurology, religion, morality, ecology, reading skills, and many others" Gender Roles Political
(Utopia/Dystopia,
Social Science) Comedy Military/
Alternate History Mystery/
Fantasy And MORE! Religious/
Spiritual Cyberpunk http://www.sfwa.org/ http://www.sfpoetry.com/
(9) (8) (Adapted from Adam Roberts) (4) Sources Scholarly Graphic Art Video Flash Animation “Steampunk Binary Clock” by ruinsofmorning.net user tarmle with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 3.0 License. “Weird TV Comedy – Spacestronauts – Episode 2” by YouTube user wierdtvcomedy (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Roberts, Adam. The History of Science Fiction. Paperback ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. viii. Print. McKitterick, Christopher. “Science Fiction: Stories for a Changing World.” Libraries Unlimited. Libraries Unlimited, Jul 2010. Web. 21 Nov 2010. <http://lu.com/ranews/jul2010/index.cfm McKitterick, Christopher. “Science Fiction: Stories for a Changing World.” Libraries Unlimited. Libraries Unlimited, Jul 2010. Web. 21 Nov 2010. <http://lu.com/ranews/jul2010/index.cfm Roberts, Adam. The History of Science Fiction. Paperback ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. ix. Print. Roberts, Adam. The History of Science Fiction. Paperback ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. 346-350. Print. Roberts, Adam. The History of Science Fiction. Paperback ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. x. Print. Roberts, Adam. The History of Science Fiction. Paperback ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. xv. Print. Roberts, Adam. The History of Science Fiction. Paperback ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. 272. Print. Gunn, James. “Teaching Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies 23.3 (1996): 377. Web. 09 Nov 2010. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4240544 (Public Domain) “Meteor” by openclipart user eady
“Earth” by openclipart user stevepetmonkey
“Comic Alien” by openclipart user Chrisdesign
“abstracted group interaction (2)” openclipart user cibo00
“perpetual motion device” by openclipart user johnny_automatic0
See the full transcript