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Partnering with Civil Society

Civil Society; the multitude of associations around which society voluntarily organises itself
by OECD DAC peer reviews on 18 November 2012

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Transcript of Partnering with Civil Society

Intro... Tapping into the knowledge, experience and expertise Evidence based research Why its important (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr (cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr 16% of total ODA was chanelled to aid through CSOs by DAC members in 2010 (USD18.4Billion) CSOs are playing a valuable
role in development Partnerhips between donors and CSOs can be improved NGO UMBRELLA GROUPS 12 LESSONS FROM DAC PEER REVIEWS INFORMAL DONOR GROUP on CIVIL SOCIETY FIND OUT MORE Evidence based research Input for this 12 lessons booklet were provided by the members of an informal steering group composed of CSO experts from selected DAC members and from NGO umbrella organisations as well as the Informal Donor Group on Civil Society Peer Reviews civil society; the multitude of associations around which society voluntarily organises itself Lessons 1 to 5 Lesson1: Have an evidence-based, overarching civil society policy WHAT: Providing an overall framework for support to strengthening civil society in developing countries based on analysis of the civil society sector and an understanding of how civil society organisations (CSOs) contribute to development Lesson 3: Promote and support public awareness-raising Lesson 4: Choose partners to meet objectives Lesson 5: Make policy dialogue meaningful WHAT: DAC members recognise the added value of dialogue and consultation with CSOs on development co-operation policies and approaches, on policy coherence for development and specific issues where CSOs specialise such as gender equality and women’s empowerment, environment, climate change and human rights. Most donors hold consultations with civil society on the overall vision and policy for development and the civil society policy, guidelines and partnerships. Lessons 6 to 9 Lesson 6: Respect idependence while giving direction Lesson 7: match funding mechanisms with the purpose Lesson 9: Build strong partnerships with humanitarian NGOs Lesson 2: Strengthen civil society in developing countries policy DCD study of how DAC members work with Civil Society WHY: Several factors contribute to predictable, relevant and effective support and partnerships. Including a clear and transparent medium-to-long-term policy that is broadly owned by CSOs that explain the purpose of supporting civil society; setting out the priorities and objectives which are operational and results-orientated. WHAT: Partnering with and supporting CSOs to build public awareness and understanding of development issues in donor and developing countries should be a priority for DAC members. WHAT: DAC member policies for supporting civil society place a stronger overall emphasis on strengthening civil society in developing countries while also recognising that civil society organisations are important partners for meeting an array of development objectives. WHY: Donors should tap into the knowledge, experience and expertise of CSOs in development when preparing policies with a view to making the policies more relevant and development-friendly, demand-driven and focused on results. WHAT: DAC members need to strike a balance between the conditions they attach to funding for CSOs and respecting the role of CSOs as independent development actors. WHAT: DAC members and CSOs incur transaction costs
notably in relation to the administrative, reporting and
accounting burden of their co-operation. The Strategic Framework Delivering Effective Support Learning & Accountability These 12 Lessons... Representatives of Australia, Canada, Denmark, Japan , Norway and Poland provided valuable oversight as members of the 12 Lessons editorial board
represent the first ever DCD/DAC publication on donor support for aid partnerships with CSOs WHAT: DAC members should seek strengthen civil society in developing countries by promoting an enabling environment - understood as the political, financial, legal and policy context that affects how CSOs carry out their work. WHY: Strengthening civil society in developing countries can empower citizens to participate in development and to taking-up democratic ownership - a pillar of effective development. Most DAC members work to strengthen civil society in developing countries through, for example, governance, democracy and state building programmes. Publication Launch
24 October 2012
OECD, Paris PARTNERING WITH CIVIL SOCIETY:
12 Lessons from DAC Peer Reviews (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr (cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr However Lessons 10 to 12 Lesson 10: Focus reporting on results and learning Lesson 12: Commission evaluations
for learning and accountability Lesson 11: Increase transparency and accountability WHAT: Increasing parliamentary and public pressure for governments to demonstrate the results of their development co-operation has caused DAC members to increase their accountability and reporting requirements on all aspects of their development co-operation, including partnerships with CSOs. WHAT: All DAC members monitor and evaluate programmes and projects implemented on their behalf by CSOs and they do this in various ways – most often either by placing evaluation requirements on the CSO itself or by commissioning evaluations. Civil society is the multitude of associations around which society voluntarily organises itself and which represent a wide range of interests and ties DAC members should seek to strengthen civil society in developing countries by promoting an enabling environment - understood as the political, financial, legal and policy context that affects how CSOs carry out their work Partnering with and supporting CSOs to build public awareness and understanding of development issues in donor and developing countries should be a priority for DAC members OECD.ORG WHY: Civil society partners need to be selected on the basis of their capability to meet the objectives of the DAC member's policy because this improves the chances of achieving results. meaningful policy dialogue build public awareness evidence-based research overarching civil society policy partners that reach objectives grass-roots knowledge respect independence build strong partnerships minimise transaction costs CSOs as independent development actors knowlegde, experience and expertise development-friendly policies WHY: In the Busan Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation (2011) DAC members agreed to implement commitments to enable CSOs to exercise their roles as independent development actors, with a particular focus on an enabling environment, consistent with agreed international rights, that maximises the contributions of CSOs to development. WHAT: DAC members provide funds to CSOs in several ways, the most common being project and programme support, calls for proposals, and partnership/framework agreements (usually multi-annual funding arrangement). WHY: Donors should have a mix of formal funding mechanisms which can be tailored to suit CSO partners, strengthen ownership and match policy objectives. Using an appropriate funding mechanism will contribute to more effective partnerships, maximise impact and value for money and give greater flexibility to adapt to changing situations and needs. Lesson 8: Minimise transaction costs WHY: Reducing transaction costs for DAC members and CSOs would free up valuable resources for programme implementation, knowledge gathering and sharing, seeking synergies and policy dialogue. WHAT: DAC members agree that effective humanitarian action must be based on strong, equal and principled partnerships with NGOs, and most now recognise and support the interdependence of the humanitarian and development communities. WHY: DAC member staff cut-backs, coupled with a shift away from technical specialists and declining budget resources, reinforce the need to move towards a more strategic approach to humanitarian partnerships. results & learning evaluate learning focus reporting on results value for money transparency & accountability effective humanitarian action a must WHY: The end goal of DAC members’ development co-operation commitments is to achieve sustainable development results, and reporting requested from CSOs as part of partnership arrangements should focus on these. Reporting must meet the DAC member’s accountability needs while also being relevant, useful and not too burdensome for CSOs (see Lesson 8). WHAT: Transparency and openness are important at all stages of the partnerships between DAC members and CSOs. DAC members, CSOs, and other key stakeholders should be concerned about value for money and must be accountable for results, including to the beneficiaries of programmes, their donors and members. WHY: Public confidence in government spending on development co-operation can wane if funding is perceived as being opaque or badly managed. WHY: DAC members should commission evaluations in response to clearly identified learning or accountability needs. It is important for DAC members to have a flexible approach to evaluation that adapts the type of evaluation to needs, the setting and the programmes at hand. WHY: Civil society partners need to be selected on the basis of their capability to meet the objectives of the DAC member's policy because this improves the chances of achieving results. michael.ward@oecd.org
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