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Journey Of A Red Blood Cell

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by Tanmay Sood on 6 November 2012

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Transcript of Journey Of A Red Blood Cell

By Tanmay Sood
8OB The Journey Of A Red Blood Cell What is a Red Blood Cell? 120 Days Pass.. To start of, there are approximately 25 trillion red blood cells in a human body.
My name is Bob and I am a red blood cell, probably because I am the red part in the blood. People also call me by my nickname, Erythrocyte. I look like a flat round disc, a lot like a miniature donut; but without the hole in the center. Most importantly, I am not alone. There are around 25 trillions of us in the human body. In each drop of blood, there are about 300 million red blood cells. An Introduction From
The One And Only BOB! Before I start, I first need to explain to you what blood is... Blood is a mixture of fluid and solid matter. Blood contains plasma (a liquid that contains dissolved substances) and cells and cell fragments. These include:
-Red blood cells, which transport oxygen
-White blood cells, which protect against disease
-Platelets, which help the blood to clot (to stop bleeding) It has been 120 days... I seem to be breaking down. Well folks, I guess that this is the end of mine and your journey. I hope to see you again later....

BOB A Red Blood Cell is a specialized cell with no nucleus. It has a specific function of transporting oxygen throughout the body. It is shaped as a flat round disc, is red because it contains a lot of haemoglobin and is microscopic small. This is Bob, He is a red blood cell and he is going to tell his story about what happens to red blood cells. I am a part of the blood which flows in everyone’s body and keeps people alive. The heart pumps blood to all parts of the body and brings them oxygen and food. At the same time blood carries all the substances the body doesn’t need, away from the body. Blood A Bit More Information on BOB Since I am too small (about 6-8 micrometers in diameter) I have to squish in to the small capillaries where the blood vessels are the smallest. I travel too fast. In human body I may take just 20 seconds to complete my journey – one cycle of circulation This is what I do:
I transport oxygen from the lungs to the tissues around our body.I get waste carbon dioxide from the tissues to lungs, where it can be breathed out. Heart

1. Once I (deoxygenated) return to the heart, I enter either through the superior vana cava or the inferior vena cava. The superior vena cava returns deoxygenated blood from the upper part of the body to the heart. The inferior vena cava returns deoxygenated blood from the lower part of the body to the heart. These large veins lead into the right atrium.

2. Then I passes through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle.

3. After that I get pumped through the pulmonary valve into the pulmonary artery and on to the lungs. There I give off carbon dioxide and I pick up oxygen.

4. I return to the heart through a pulmonary vein, enter the left atrium, pass through the mitral valve, and flow into the left ventricle.

5. The left ventricle pumps me (fully oxygenated) through the aortic valve, into the aorta, the body's main artery, and out to the body.

6. From the aorta, I flow into one of the many arteries of the body, through the arterioles, and then to the capillaries, where I will deliver oxygen and nutrients to the cells and remove wastes and carbon dioxide. Next I move through the venules, veins, and on to the vena cava in a deoxygenated state, and return to the heart, only to begin its repetitive journey once again. This whole process has only taken approximately 20 seconds! Here We Go! The blood flow around our body is called our circulation. The heart connects the two major portions of the circulation's continuous circuit, the systemic circulation and the pulmonary circulation. The blood vessels in the pulmonary circulation carry the blood through the lungs to pick up oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide, while the blood vessels in the systemic circulation carry the blood throughout the rest of our body. Heart The heart is a muscular bag surrounding four hollow compartments, with a thin wall of muscle separating the left hand side from the right hand side.
The muscles in the heart are very strong so that they can continuously push the blood to our head and feet. Lungs My role of red cells is to absorb oxygen through the little alveoli in our lungs and deliver it to all the muscles, tissues and organs in our body.
To do this, they travel through large arteries and tiny capillaries. Sometimes the capillaries are so small, the red cells have to squeeze and bend themselves in half to get through in order to release their load of oxygen
But that's only half the trip! After they deliver the oxygen, the red blood cells pick up a waste product called carbon dioxide, known as CO2. Then they make the return trip back to the lungs through the veins where the CO2 can finally be released. The body eliminates carbon dioxide every time we breathe out! Then, the red blood cells start the trip all over again. We are continuously undergoing a hemolysis (breaking apart) process. As we disintegrate, the hemoglobin is degraded or broken into globin, the protein part, iron (conserved for latter use), and heme. The heme initially breaks apart into biliverdin, a green pigment, which is rapidly reduced to bilirubin, an orange-yellow pigment. These processes all occur in the reticuloendothelial cells of the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. The bilirubin is then transported to the liver where it reacts with a solubilizing sugar called glucuronic acid. This more soluble form of bilirubin (conjugated) is excreted into the bile.
The bile goes through the gall bladder into the intestines where the bilirubin is changed into a variety of pigments. The most important ones are stercobilin, which is excreted in the feces, and urobilinogen, which is reabsorbed back into the blood. The blood transports the urobilinogen back to the liver where it is either re-excreted into the bile or into the blood for transport to the kidneys. Urobilinogen is finally excreted as a normal component of the urine. Liver Spleen We are continuously undergoing a hemolysis (breaking apart) process. As we disintegrate, the hemoglobin is degraded or broken into globin, the protein part, iron (conserved for latter use), and heme. The heme initially breaks apart into biliverdin, a green pigment, which is rapidly reduced to bilirubin, an orange-yellow pigment. These processes all occur in the reticuloendothelial cells of the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. The bilirubin is then transported to the liver where it reacts with a solubilizing sugar called glucuronic acid. This more soluble form of bilirubin (conjugated) is excreted into the bile.
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