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Contemporary Cultural Diversity Issues

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by roland marsh on 20 June 2013

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Transcript of Contemporary Cultural Diversity Issues

Contemporary Cultural Diversity Issues
Gailyah, Micheal, Roland
Overview
•The criminal justice system’s response to the public’s perception of ethnic
and gender bias
•The arguments for and against the contention that the criminal justice system discriminates against racial and ethnic minority groups

- Whether the criminal justice system discriminates against any group
- A contemporary issue or event related to each of the two topics to support your arguments
The criminal justice system’s response to the public’s perception of ethnic bias
and gender bias
The arguments that the criminal justice system discriminates against racial and ethnic minority groups
Does the Criminal Justice System Discriminate?
Does the Criminal Justice System Discriminate?
A contemporary issue or event related to the first of the two topics to support your arguments
A contemporary issue or event related to the second, of the two topics to support your arguments
Recap
•The criminal justice system’s response to the public’s perception of ethnic
and gender bias
•The arguments for
and against the contention that the criminal justice system discriminates against racial and ethnic minority groups


- Whether the criminal justice system discriminates against any group
- A contemporary issue or event related to each of the two topics to support your arguments
Any Questions??
Reference
All law enforcement officers will be required to get training in cultural diversity and bias-based profiling in 2013 under guidelines adopted by a committee that studied the issue in Maine.

The Advisory Committee on Bias-Based Profiling by Law Enforcement and Law Enforcement Agencies was formed in 2009 after a bill to ban profiling was introduced in the Legislature.

Advisory committee members reported back to the Legislature's Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee Thursday to recommend training for police officers, a public symposium to be held later this year, and mandatory policies adopted by local police departments.

The bill did not stem from any particular incident of profiling in Maine, but came about because of federal efforts to ban the practice.
(Cover, 2012)
1. Promote equality in policing policies (free from cultural and institutional bias)
2. Require/promote diversity training/education for police officers
3. Work with grassroots agencies to build programs
4. Invest in prevention and community-based services
A perception of gender bias lingers in Mississippi state courts, according to surveys of judges, court staff and lawyers.The Supreme Court of Mississippi Task Force on Gender Fairness today submitted its findings to the Legislature.
Findings include:
A majority of legal professionals believes, overall, that there is a greater measure of unfairness toward women than men in the Mississippi court system.
In general, patterns of gender bias in the state court system are perceived to be relatively low and non-systemic.
Perceptions of fairness or unfairness vary with the gender of the respondents.
(Pettigrew Kraft, 2002)
A 2005 study by the Department of Justice showed that blacks, whites, and hispanics were stopped on a equal basis.
The same study showed that hispanics were searched 11% of the time and blacks were searched 10% of the time, but whites were only searched 3.5% of the time.
Blacks offenders also received a higher percentage of prison sentences along with longer maximum sentences than white offenders for most offenses.
20% of black defendants convicted of murdering a white person receive the death penalty while only 8% of whites killing whites and 1%of blacks killing blacks receive the death penalty.
Sentencing laws also might bias the black community such as harsher penalties for crimes involving crack cocaine. This will inevitably affect the black communities.
There is a disparity of the number of women employed in law enforcement.
Women consist of 46% of the US workforce but only 12% and declining in law enforcement.
Women have been proven to be more effective communicators and less confrontational than men in law enforcement.
Blacks consist of 12.6% of the US population and 38.9%of all violent crime and 29.8% of property-crime.
The National Crime Victimization Survey shows that an average black compared to an average white is more likely to be identified as an offender of a crime.
This NCVS data shows the average arrest rate is proportional to the number of blacks and whites identified as being identified as offenders in the survey.
The arrest rates between black and white law enforcement officers are similar
The National Academy of Sciences concluded on review of more than 70 studies on sentencing patterns that: Our overall assessment of the available research suggests that factors other than racial discrimination in the sentencing process account for most of the disproportionate representation of black males in U.S. prisons ..."
Cover, S. (February 3, 2012). Committee recommends bias training for all law enforcement.
Retrieved from http://www.kjonline.com/news/bias-training-recommended-for-police_2012-02-02.html

Discover the Network. (2012). Retrieved from
http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewSubCategory.asp?id=1627

Felperin, J. (May 18, 2004). Women in Law Enforcement. Policeone.com. Retrieved from
http://http://www.policeone.com/police-recruiting/articles/87017-Women-in-Law
Enforcement-Two-steps-forward-three-steps-back/

Glater, J. (2012, October 7, 2012). Race Gap: Crime vs. Punishment . New York Times.
Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/07/weekinreview/07glater.html?_r=0

Glater, J. (October 7, 2012). Race Gap: Crime vs. Punishment . New York Times. Retrieved from
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/07/weekinreview/07glater.html?_r=0

Pettigrew Kraft, B. (January 7, 2002). Perception of gender bias lingers in state court. Retrieved
from http://courts.ms.gov/news/2002/1.07.02gender.htm

The leadership conference. (2013). Justice on trial. Retrieved from
http://www.civilrights.org/publications/justice-on-trial/
(Glator, 2012) (Felperin, 2004)
("Discover the Network," 2012)
In the criminal justice system racial inequality is growing, not receding.

In 1964 Congress passed the Civil Rights Act prohibiting discrimination in employment. Yet today, three out of every ten African American males born in the United States will serve time in prison, a status that renders their prospects for legitimate employment bleak and often bars them from obtaining professional licenses.

In 1965 Congress passed the Voting Rights Act. Yet today, 31 percent of all black men in Alabama and Florida are permanently disenfranchised as a result of felony convictions. Nationally, 1.4 million black men have lost the right to vote under these laws.

In 1965 Congress passed the Immigration and Nationality Act, which sought to eliminate the vestiges of racial discrimination in the nation's immigration laws. Yet today, Hispanic and Asian Americans are routinely and sometimes explicitly singled out for immigration enforcement.

In 1968 Congress passed the Fair Housing Act. Yet today, the current housing for approximately 2 million Americans – two-thirds of them African American or Hispanic – is a prison or jail cell.
(The leadership council, 2013)
(The Leadership Council, 2013)
Under a federal court consent decree:
Traffic stops by the Maryland State Police on Interstate 95 were monitored.

In the two year period from January 1995 to December 1997, 70% of the drivers stopped and searched by the police were black

While only 17.5% of overall drivers – as well as overall speeders -- were black.
Volusia County, Florida, in 1992, nearly 70% of those stopped on a particular interstate highway in Central Florida were black or Hispanic, although only 5% of the drivers on that highway were black or Hispanic.

Moreover, minorities were detained for longer periods of time per stop than whites, and were 80% of those whose cars were searched after being stopped.

The discriminatory treatment of minority drivers was duly noted by Volusia County Sergeant Dale Anderson, who asked a white motorist he had stopped how he was doing; the motorist responded “Not very good,” to which Anderson responded, “Could be worse – could be black.”
(The Leadership Council, 2013)
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