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EDX3270 Assignment 1 - ePortfolio

selection, annotation and discussion of 10 articles or book chapters relating to literacy learning, presented as an ePortfolio
by Jay Page on 13 April 2011

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Transcript of EDX3270 Assignment 1 - ePortfolio

ANNOTATIONS ANNOTATIONS Healy, A. (2008). Expanding Student Capacities: Learning by Design Pedagogy. In Healy, A. (Ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 2-29). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. Healy, A. (2008). Expanding Student Capacities: Learning by Design Pedagogy. In Healy, A. (Ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 2-29). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. In this chapter Healy is exploring learning by design as a new learning theory framework. She describes old modes of literacy as restrictive and outmoded and explores the potential within the new framework to cater for diversity, global texts, multimodality, critical framing and real world learning. Healy also discusses the emergence of the five text designs with the multimodal paradigm shift from print to digital-interactive-media. The new learning theory challenges existing curriculums and brings relevance to students. The author also suggests teachers become part of the learning community and allowing students to have agency over their learning. While reflecting on successful multiliteracies experiences, Healy shows links between the theory and two classroom examples. Exely, B. (2008). Communities of Learners: Early years Students, New Learning Pedagogy and Transitions. In In Healy, A. (ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 126-143). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. This chapter looks at the changing social order of education, referring to it as the knowledge society with teachers and students needing to critically engage with multimodality. Exley uses an example of an early years experience to highlight the use of multiliteracties and a community of learners. She details how this allows the children alternatives and individual starting points. Although creating challenges it gives students the ability to overcome these challenges with their own agency. This example exposes the difference between then and now with comparison between traditional, progressivist and transformative curriculums. She also details how a transformative curriculum can broaden students’ horizon of knowledge and capabilities. Morrow, L. M. (2008). Creating a Literacy-Rich Preschool Classroom Environment to Enhance Literacy Instruction. In DeBruin-Parecki, A. (Ed.), Effective Early Literacy Practice: Here’s How, Here’s Why (pp. 1-13). Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H, Brooks Publishing Co. This chapter focuses on the physical environment and the human interactions within early years services, as an essential element for successful learning. It shows a link between curriculum and environment. Morrow uses examples of exemplary services using print and interactions rich classrooms to explain how this enhances literacy learning. All examples within the chapter are designed to contain characteristics proven to be important in classrooms, from research. Morrow discusses the use of learning centres, literacy learning across curriculum areas and within independent learning to small groups. Overview blah blah blah, type overview here blah blah blah Morrow, L. M. (1989). Designing the Classroom to Promote Literacy Development. In Strickland, D. S., Morrow, L. M. (Eds.), Emerging Literacy: Young Children Learn To Read and Write (pp. 121-134). Newark, Del. :International Reading Association. This chapter describes how to ensure the physical environment of early years classrooms will best support literacy development. Morrow uses detailed examples of literacy experiences integrated with other areas of learning. The author uses visual samples of literacy learning as it occurred in examples, floor plans, and photos of children engaging in literacy learning are presented in a manner that induces further thinking. The chapter details how the learning environment, if purposefully designed, will positively affect the children’s literacy learning. The author offers strategies to design a rich literacy environment as an overall classroom and into specific areas of the classroom. Included in the chapter are educators’ thoughts on the impact the implementation of a rich literacy environment has had on the children. Knobel, M., & Healy, A. (1998). Critical literacies: An introduction. In Knobel, M., & Healy, A.. (Eds.), Critical Literacies in the Primary Classroom (pp. 1-12). Newtown, N.S.W.: Primary English Teaching Association. This chapter is setting the scene for the book while looking at what critical literacy is. The authors believe critical literacies is high on all teachers educational agenda, though there is disagreement of exactly what it is. This leads into a broad definition of critical literacies and explores deeper into its uses within the primary educational setting. The reasons for engaging in critical literacies are explored with an emphasis on ensuring there are boundaries and guides. The boundaries and guides are used to ensure there are potential social benefits and that it addresses ethical and injustice in literacy. Knobel, M. (1998). Critical literacy in teacher education. In Knobel, M., & Healy, A.. (Eds.), Critical Literacies in the Primary Classroom (pp. 89-112). Newtown, N.S.W.: Primary English Teaching Association. Knobel uses this chapter for teachers to base their understandings of critical literacy on, by building on theoretical and practical work from preceding chapters. She discusses three main sections of conceptualising critical literacy, text analysis and perspectives on teaching practice. Her approach has two strands – developing beginning teachers’ understandings and modelling possible approaches. There is an importance placed on teachers and students understanding critical literacies with examples of activities and resources used to explore meaning and use of critical literacy in primary classrooms. Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (2010). Visual and Critical Literacy. In Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (Eds.), Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education (pp. 488 - 508). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. The main focus of this chapter is the use of visual and critical literacies within multiliteracies pedagogy. The authors suggest that this approach, that involves analysing and questioning, be used within all educational settings including the early years. Importance of visual and critical literacy is discussed in regards to the multimodality needed by students to negotiate current modes of literacy. Deconstruction, reconstruction and juxtaposition are three broad approaches that are described in detail. Fellowes and Oakley present activities and suggestions that would be useful for early childhood educators who are teaching critical literacies. Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., and the Learning by Design Project Group (2005), The Conditions of Learning In Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., and the Learning by Design Project Group (Eds.), Learning by Design (pp. 37-52). Melbourne: Victorian Schools Innovation Commission, and Common Ground Publishing. In this chapter the fundamental conditions of effective learning are described and discussed. The authors talk about the two fundamental conditions as being; belonging and transformation. They describe how belonging occurs when formal learning meets the students’ life-worlds and transformation occurs as knowledge and capabilities are broadened. It is acknowledged that learning occurs naturally and can span over a life time and that education needs to be a conscious nurturing of learning. The authors define the difference between formal and informal learning focusing on the current shift due to contextual diversity. It is presented that tradition formal teaching is no longer effective on its own as more learning is occurring informally with more relevance to the student. The authors elaborate on learning by design by engaging students in their life-worlds and introducing facts and theories. Makin, L. & Jones Díaz, C. (2002). (eds) New pathways for Litereacy in Early Childhood Education. In Makin, L. & Jones Díaz, C. (eds.), Literacies in Early Childhood: Changing views, challenging practice (pp. 325-335). Maclennan & Petty: Rosebery. This chapter discusses the major practical implications of literacy education in early childhood. The authors focus on two main implications; the increase of technology and how literacy is becoming more multimodal and globalisations and how there is more linguistic diversity. They explore both implications in detail. The author states that teachers are often scared of new technologies, requiring training and that most research into technology searches for the negatives. Also discussed is how the sector lags behind with very little LOTE being offered. The authors discuss literacy as a social practice as the attention has been turned back onto the education system and the community. With early childhood educators preparing children for school literacies that are often print based as schools are under pressure to prepare children for basic tests which ignore LOTE and technoliteracies. New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing social futures. Havard Education review, 66 (1). ANNOTATIONS New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing social futures. Harvard Education review, 66 (1). Healy, A. (2008). Expanding Student Capacities: Learning by Design Pedagogy. In Healy, A. (Ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 2-29). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. In this chapter Healy is exploring learning by design as a new learning theory framework. She describes old modes of literacy as restrictive and outmoded and explores the potential within the new framework to cater for diversity, global texts, multimodality, critical framing and real world learning. Healy also discusses the emergence of the five text designs with the multimodal paradigm shift from print to digital-interactive-media. The new learning theory challenges existing curriculums and brings relevance to students. The author also suggests teachers become part of the learning community and allowing students to have agency over their learning. While reflecting on successful multiliteracies experiences, Healy shows links between the theory and two classroom examples which allows the reader to gain a deeper understanding. Exely, B. (2008). Communities of Learners: Early years Students, New Learning Pedagogy and Transitions. In In Healy, A. (ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 126-143). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. This chapter looks at the changing social order of education, referring to it as the knowledge society with teachers and students needing to critically engage with multimodality. Exley uses an example of an early years experience to highlight the use of multiliteracies and a community of learners. She details how this allows the children alternatives and individual starting points. Although creating challenges it gives students the ability to overcome these challenges with their own agency. This example exposes the difference between then and now with comparison between traditional, progressivist and transformative curriculums. She also details how a transformative curriculum can broaden students’ horizon of knowledge and capabilities. OVERVIEW Morrow, L. M. (2008). Creating a Literacy-Rich Preschool Classroom Environment to Enhance Literacy Instruction. In DeBruin-Parecki, A. (Ed.), Effective Early Literacy Practice: Here’s How, Here’s Why (pp. 1-13). Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H, Brooks Publishing Co. This chapter focuses on the physical environment and the human interactions within early years services, as an essential element for successful learning. It shows a link between curriculum and environment. Morrow uses examples of exemplary services using print and interactions rich classrooms to explain how this enhances literacy learning. All examples within the chapter are designed to contain characteristics proven to be important in classrooms, from research. Morrow discusses the use of learning centres, literacy learning across curriculum areas and within independent learning to small groups. This chapter was similar to previous work by the author therefore is only a good resource if access to previous work does not occur. Morrow, L. M. (1989). Designing the Classroom to Promote Literacy Development. In Strickland, D. S., Morrow, L. M. (Eds.), Emerging Literacy: Young Children Learn To Read and Write (pp. 121-134). Newark, Del. :International Reading Association. This chapter describes how to ensure the physical environment of early years classrooms will best support literacy development. Morrow uses detailed examples of literacy experiences integrated with other areas of learning. The author uses visual samples of literacy learning as it occurred in examples, floor plans, and photos of children engaging in literacy learning are presented in a manner that induces further thinking. The chapter details well how the learning environment, if purposefully designed, will positively affect the children’s literacy learning. The author offers strategies to design a rich literacy environment as an overall classroom and into specific areas of the classroom. Included in the chapter are educators’ thoughts on the impact the implementation of a rich literacy environment has had on the children. Knobel, M., & Healy, A. (1998). Critical literacies: An introduction. In Knobel, M., & Healy, A.. (Eds.), Critical Literacies in the Primary Classroom (pp. 1-12). Newtown, N.S.W.: Primary English Teaching Association. This chapter is successfully setting the scene for the book while looking at what critical literacy is. The authors believe critical literacies are high on all teachers’ educational agenda, though there is disagreement of exactly what it is. This leads into a broad definition of critical literacies and explores deeper into its uses within the primary educational setting. The reasons for engaging in critical literacies are explored with an emphasis on ensuring there are boundaries and guides. The boundaries and guides are used to ensure there are potential social benefits and that it addresses ethical and injustice in literacy. Knobel, M. (1998). Critical literacy in teacher education. In Knobel, M., & Healy, A.. (Eds.), Critical Literacies in the Primary Classroom (pp. 89-112). Newtown, N.S.W.: Primary English Teaching Association. Knobel uses this chapter for teachers to base their understandings of critical literacy on, by building on theoretical and practical work from preceding chapters. She discusses three main sections of conceptualising critical literacy, text analysis and perspectives on teaching practice. Her approach has two strands – developing beginning teachers’ understandings and modelling possible approaches. There is an importance placed on teachers and students understanding critical literacies with examples of activities and resources used to explore meaning and use of critical literacy in primary classrooms. Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (2010). Visual and Critical Literacy. In Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (Eds.), Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education (pp. 488 - 508). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. The main focus of this chapter is the use of visual and critical literacies within multiliteracies pedagogy. The authors suggest that this approach, that involves analysing and questioning, be used within all educational settings including the early years. Importance of visual and critical literacy is discussed in regards to the multimodality needed by students to negotiate current modes of literacy. Deconstruction, reconstruction and juxtaposition are three broad approaches that are described in detail. Fellowes and Oakley present activities and suggestions that would be useful for early childhood educators who are teaching critical literacies. Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., and the Learning by Design Project Group (2005), The Conditions of Learning In Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., and the Learning by Design Project Group (Eds.), Learning by Design (pp. 37-52). Melbourne: Victorian Schools Innovation Commission, and Common Ground Publishing. In this chapter the fundamental conditions of effective learning are described and discussed. The authors talk about the two fundamental conditions as being; belonging and transformation. They describe how belonging occurs when formal learning meets the students’ life-worlds and transformation occurs as knowledge and capabilities are broadened. It is acknowledged that learning occurs naturally and can span over a life time and that education needs to be a conscious nurturing of learning. The authors define the difference between formal and informal learning focusing on the current shift due to contextual diversity. It is presented that tradition formal teaching is no longer effective on its own as more learning is occurring informally with more relevance to the student. The authors elaborate on learning by design by engaging students in their life-worlds and introducing facts and theories. This chapter is interesting and easy to follow. Makin, L. & Jones Díaz, C. (2002). (eds) New pathways for Literacy in Early Childhood Education. In Makin, L. & Jones Díaz, C. (eds.), Literacies in Early Childhood: Changing views, challenging practice (pp. 325-335). Maclennan & Petty: Rosebery. This chapter discusses the major practical implications of literacy education in early childhood. The authors focus on two main implications; the increase of technology and how literacy is becoming more multimodal and globalisations and how there is more linguistic diversity. They explore both implications in detail. The author states that teachers are often scared of new technologies, requiring training and that most research into technology searches for the negatives. Also discussed is how the sector lags behind with very little LOTE being offered. The authors discuss literacy as a social practice as the attention has been turned back onto the education system and the community. With early childhood educators preparing children for school literacies that are often print based as schools are under pressure to prepare children for basic tests which ignore LOTE and techno-literacies. This chapter is interesting and eye opening to literacy issues within early childhood. Many articles and chapters were read before the ten pieces of writing were chosen for the collection of annotations. This was to ensure there was a large scope of literature on modern literacy learning and teaching, within the primary and early years settings. The annotations refer to a shift away from traditional approaches of literacy learning and teaching (New London Group, 1996). These articles and chapters suggest that a multiliteracies approach will see students accept responsibility for their own learning (Exely, 2008), link prior knowledge and construct new knowledge. This also allows students to critically analyse and build social and cultural understandings.

The annotations also detail the shift in literacy learning due to globalisation and an increase in technology. The need for teachers to facilitate students learning to ensure students can work with literacy that is becoming more multimodal and with an increase in linguistic diversity is also a focus (Fellowes & Oakley, 2010). Many of the annotations discuss the importance of the environment in which students are learning and the interactions they have with peers and educators (Morrow, 2008). Within a structure that has children using their own agency and becoming involved in a community of learners will allow children to make their own meaning of literature with critical engagement (Healy, 2008).

All the readings accessed from the course materials and other sources are about modern literacy learning, teaching practices and pedagogy. This has given me a deep understanding of effective literacy teaching and pedagogy that will be remember, utilised and built on during the next few years of study and in the classroom with future students.

References
Exely, B. (2008). Communities of Learners: Early years Students, New Learning Pedagogy and Transitions. In In Healy, A. (ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 126-143). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press.

Healy, A. (2008). Expanding Student Capacities: Learning by Design Pedagogy. In Healy, A. (Ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education: new pedagogies for expanding landscapes (pp. 2-29). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press.

Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (2010). Visual and Critical Literacy. In Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (Eds.), Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education (pp. 488 - 508). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.

Morrow, L. M. (2008). Creating a Literacy-Rich Preschool Classroom Environment to Enhance Literacy Instruction. In DeBruin-Parecki, A. (Ed.), Effective Early Literacy Practice: Here’s How, Here’s Why (pp. 1-13). Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H, Brooks Publishing Co.

New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing social futures. Harvard Education review, 66 (1). The main focus of this article is multiliteracy. It is a theoretical overview of the connections between social environments changing and the need for a new approach to literacy. The authors discuss the limitations of traditional literacy and how these are overcome with multiliteracies. Multiliteracy is achieving two goals, students’ access to evolving language and critical engagement. The article is attempting to broaden readers understanding of literacy, teaching and learning. The authors argue that literacy pedagogy must include the ever increasing variety of text including technology. The article is great as it goes into great detail of the four components of pedagogy suggested by the authors of situated practice, overt instruction, critical framing and transformed practice, though is lengthy and in places difficult to gain understanding. by Jaylene Page
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