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TESS Training Domain 3

Edit of Mary McCarthy's original Prezi
by Anne Kubicki on 18 October 2013

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Transcript of TESS Training Domain 3

Domain 3: Instruction
Charlotte Danielson's Framework for Teaching
Bringing Content to Life!
Domain 3 has 5 components that are the essential part of teaching - the actual engagement of students in content.
Domain 3: The heart of the framework
3A - Communicating with Students
3B - Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
3C - Engaging Students in Learning
3D - Using Assessment in Instruction
3E - Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
Component 3B:
Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
Good questions tend to be divergent rather than convergent.

High quality questions promote thinking and making connections.

In a well run discussion the teacher does not hold center stage.

In a well run discussion all students are engaged.
Component 3D:
Using Assessment in Instruction
Elements
1. Assessment Criteria
2. Monitoring of Student Learning
3. Feedback to Students
4. Student Self-Assessment and Monitoring of Progress
5. Lesson Adjustment
Component 3E:
Flexibility and Responsiveness
Adjusting a lesson midstream...

When an instructional activity is not working.

When an activity is not appropriate for some students.

When a change of pace is needed.

When a spontaneous event occurs.
Objectives
To understand the 5 components of Domain 3
To distinguish between the different levels of each component
Component 3C:
Engaging Students in Learning
Student engagement is the most important component of the framework for teaching.

It is through engagement that students learn complex content.

Student engagement is NOT the same as "time on task."

Intellectual involvement with the content or active construction of understanding is required for student engagement.

Hands-on is Not enough; it MUST be "minds on."
Component 3A:
Communicating with Students
For students to become engaged in learning, they must receive clear directions and explanations.

When teachers speak, students must be able to hear and understand them.

When teachers offer an explanation, it should aid in learning.

Teaching is purposeful; that purpose should be clear to students.

Teachers' language should reflect correct usage and contain expressive vocabulary.
Elements
1. Expectations for Learning
2. Directions and Procedures
3. Explanation of Content
4. Use of Oral and Written Language
Activity
Working with a partner use the rubric to assign a performance level to each of the examples.
The teacher links the instructional purpose of the lesson, emotion in poetry, to lyrics in music. The teacher begins her explanation by having students recall what the music teacher taught them about high and low notes in music and how the different notes make people feel. Students work in pairs to develop a definition for "emotion." The teacher uses a student-generated definition to begin her lesson on words in poetry. The teacher finds several opportunities to extend student vocabulary with the words "nonchalant" and excerpt."
These observations demonstrate the critical attributes of a level 4.
Distinguished
The teacher opens the lesson with a review of the components of a business letter; this is followed, for the most part, by a monologue on the concept of revising. However, the teacher does not clarify the distinction between revising and editing. Students are asked to revise the letter the teacher is handing back and then write another letter. As the teacher conferences with some students, there is some confusion as to which letter to write and to whom.
A.
B.
C.
D.
These observations demonstrate critical attributes of a level 2.
Needs
Improvement
The teacher's explanation of the content is clear and accurate. The teacher has a student come forward to highlight the base of a parallelogram, and all the other students listen. The teacher asks students to help the student working at the board. Students then work in pairs to discuss the height of the triangles. The teacher then transitions from review to an activity for the day and gives clear procedural information regarding the use of stations. All students proceed to their assigned locations and immediately begin the task.
The observations demonstrate critical attributes of a level 3.
Proficient
The teacher's examples leave students confused. The teacher responds to the confusion by saying, "I'm going to get more examples of that. The way I explained it is not clicking with you." The teacher makes errors in explaining the content; she confuses the use of "fewer" and "less." Students are often unable to give the correct responses. The teacher asks at several points, "does everyone understand?" Only a faint response is heard. The teacher asks clarifying questions but answers the question herself. The teacher uses the word "ain't."
These observations demonstrate critical attributes of a level 1.
Unsatisfactory
Elements
1. Quality of Questions/Prompts
2. Discussion Techniques
3. Student Participation
Activity
While viewing the Teachscape videos, use the rubric for Component 3B: Using Questioning Techniques to evaluate each teacher's performance.
"An important technique for determining the level of student engagement in the activities and assignments in a class is to examine not only the directions for the activities and assignments themselves, but the quality of student work in response to the directions. When students are not engaged, they will 'blow it off.' whereas when they are engaged in the task, their work, even when incorrect, reflects serious thinking." (Danielson p.84)
Elements
1. Activities and Assignments
2. Grouping of Students
3. Instructional Materials and Resources
4. Structure and Pacing
Activity
Highlight the key words in the descriptions on the rubric to identify the key differences between the levels.
Activity
While watching the Teachscape videos

1. Identify relevant evidence of component 3A: Communicating with Students.

2. Identify the level of the teacher's performance based on the rubric.
Activity
While watching the Teachscape videos

1. Identify relevant evidence of component 3C: Engaging Students in Learning.

2. Identify the level of the teacher's performance based on the rubric.
Assessment is no longer just at the end of instruction but has become an integral part of instruction.

Through a skillful use of formative assessment, teachers promote learning.

Teachers prepare specific techniques to elicit from students evidence of learning.

Providing feedback to students is an important aspect of using assessment.

To be effective, feedback should be accurate, constructive, substantive, specific and timely.

Students take responsibility for their learning when they engage in self-assessment.
Activity
While viewing the Teachscape videos, use the rubric for Component 3D: Using Assessment in Instruction to evaluate each teacher's performance.
Activity
Working with a partner use the rubric to assign a performance level to each of the examples.
The teacher provides mostly general feedback to students. To one student's drawing, the teacher says, "That's amazing." When a student asks whether he has completed the assignment correctly, the teacher only replies, "yup." To another student, she says, "Check your assignment with a classmate sitting next to you when you are done." Likewise, questions are global. For example, the teacher says, "Do we all understand the structure?" When students respond to this and ask about a particular part, of the structure, the teacher replies, "We'll go to that in just a minute.
These observations demonstrate the critical attributes of a level 2.
Needs Improvement
The teacher circulates as students work independently. He gives content-specific feedback to each student. For example, the teacher sees that a student is struggling with one of the problems. He says, "Area equals length times width. So, think about what two numbers would multiply by one another to equal that area, okay?" Assessment is regularly used during instruction. As the teacher circulates, he asks individual students specific questions to figure out which parts of the lesson are giving most students problems. He then brings the class back together as a whole group and says, " Let's see everybody take a look right here for just a moment." After clarification, the teacher instructs the students to work independently.
A.
B.
C.
D.
These observations demonstrate critical attributes of a level 3.
Proficient
The teacher tries to explain the difference between "in" and "into." The students look quite confused despite the teacher's explanation and turn to other students sitting at their table for help. The teacher does not appear to notice that some of the students have become confused and does not adjust the lesson or try to explain the difference in another way. The teacher stays mostly her desk and does not circulate while students are doing a worksheet at their desks.
The observations demonstrate critical attributes of a level 1.
Unsastisfactory
The students are given an assignment to draft letters to a pen pal. Before students get to work, the teacher asks students to think about what makes a good letter and then works with them to develop a rubric that will serve as the basis for the letter's assessment. The teacher then instructs students to work in small groups to draft and edit one another's work. While the students are working with each other, the teacher circulates around the classroom, conferencing with all students. The teacher conferences with one student to show her how the letter should be indented and asks,"Do you understand what you needed to do here?" The student then tells the teacher if she understands or not.
These observations demonstrate critical attributes of a level 4.
Distinguished
Elements
1. Assessment Criteria
2. Monitoring of Student Learning
3. Feedback to Students
4. Student Self-Assessment and Monitoring of Progress
5. Lesson Adjustment
Please take a moment to read your section of Domain 3. You may be asked to facilitate discussion about your component during today's session.
Domain 3 Reflection

Based on our discussions today evaluate yourself on each component of Domain 3. You may want to consider a specific lesson from this past year, or you may wish to consider your general performance. How can you move yourself to the next level?

What areas do you feel are strengths for you? What evidence would you provide of these strengths?

Which component(s) do you feel you need to develop further? How do you plan to do this?
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