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Open-Ended Questions & RSSE

Strategies for responding to open-ended questions.
by Nicole Greene on 18 November 2012

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Transcript of Open-Ended Questions & RSSE

Open Ended Questions RSSE Strategies for Success! In order to get the finished product you need all parts of the formula:

Answer ALL parts of the question
Restate the question in your response for each question
Support your response with specific details from the story (quotes)
Support the text by explaining in your own words
Extend - Connect to your life, the world, or another text. Think of it as a formula... First. . . . Answer ALL parts of the question! Example: In "The Cattle of the Sun God," Eurylochus attempts to persuade the men to betray Odysseus.

What is Eurylochus' "insidious plea"?
If you were a member of the crew, would you be swayed by this argument, or would you heed Odysseus' warning?

Support your answers with specific examples from the text, including line numbers where necessary.

How many parts are there to this question?
What are they? Second. . . Restate the question in your response for EACH question. Example: In "The Cattle of the Sun God," Eurylochus attempts to persuade the men to betray Odysseus.

What is Eurylochus' "insidious plea"?
If you were a member of the crew, would you be swayed by this argument, or would you heed Odysseus' warning?

Support your answers with specific examples from the text, including line numbers where necessary.

Answer:
Eurylochus, in "The Cattle of the Sun God," tries to talk the other men to betray Odysseus by eating Lord Helios's cattle. He argues that . . .
If I had I been one of Odysseus' men faced with this decision, I would . . . Third . . . As a general rule: One question = One Paragraph Support your answers with specific details from the text (QUOTES) and explain HOW the text supports your answer. Eurylochus, in "The Cattle of the Sun God," tries to talk the other men into betraying Odysseus by eating Lord Helios's cattle. He argues that starving to death would be cowardly after all they have faced and he exclaims, "Better open your lungs to a big sea once for all/than waste to skin and bones on a lonely island!" (892-894) He reasons that he would rather drown and die trying than to sit back and die hungry. And Finally . . . EXTEND!! ~to self, world, or text The way Odysseus' men betrayed his order not to eat the cattle reminds me of when he ordered them not to touch the bag containing the stormy winds. They didn't listen to their leader, opened the bag, and were blown off course once again. Maybe if the men had learned their lesson and obeyed Odysseus' by not slaying the cattle, they would not have all perished. Let's put it all together! Eurylochus, in "The Cattle of the Sun God," tries to talk the other men into betraying Odysseus by eating Lord Helios's cattle. He argues that starving to death would be cowardly after all they have faced and he exclaims, "Better open your lungs to a big sea once for all/than waste to skin and bones on a lonely island!" (892-894) He reasons that he would rather drown and die trying than to sit back and die hungry. If I had I been one of Odysseus' men faced with this decision, I would not have been so easily swayed by Eurylochus's argument. The way Odysseus' men betray his order not to eat the cattle reminds me of when he ordered them not to touch the bag containing the stormy winds. They didn't listen to their leader, opened the bag, and were blown off course once again. Maybe if the men had learned their lesson and obeyed Odysseus' by not slaying the cattle, they would not have all perished. Uh-oh! Something's not right. Work with your partner to find my error. Open Ended Questions Always be specific with your details.
Never assume the reader knows what you are talking about.
Include the title & author!
Use character names and watch use of pronouns (he, she, they, etc.) Watch your transitions!! Try not to repeat transition words.
Refer to your transition handout for help and ideas! Explain, Explain, Explain!! Always explain WHY or HOW your connection & text support relates to your response.

When in doubt, explain in more detail! It's simply a strategy to help you organize your thoughts - your focus should be on answering the question effectively, not how to format your writing. Put your text support in context so the reader does not need to have read the story to understand your answer. Use YOUR OWN words, NOT sentence stems. Try to make a SPECIFIC connection to the text. Other stories, books, movies, etc. Try to stay away from connecting to you own life. Again, avoid sentence stems!!
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