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Copy of Conditional Sentences

Structure of conditional sentences 1st, 2nd, 3rd
by Ernst Endt on 17 March 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Conditional Sentences

Conditional Sentences First Conditional: real possibility In order to explain the Conditional Sentences, we will think of Tom.

Tom has real problems because his ship sank and he arrived at a tiny island. On the island there is only grass and a palm tree.

It is always sunny there but he has no food nor water. What can he do? Tom finds two new problems:




We use WILL + INFINITIVE to talk about the possible future result. The important thing about the first conditional is that there is a real possibility that the condition will happen.
He thinks:
“If I stay on the island, I will get burned” He thinks:
“If I swim, the sharks will eat me”

1. There is a fire on the island!


2. There are sharks in the sea! Notice that we are thinking about a future condition. Tom is not swimming right now. But he can see the sharks. We use the present simple tense to talk about the possible future condition. Second Conditional: Improbable if + Present Simple + Will INFINITIVE “If I stay on the island, I will get burned” “If I swim, the sharks will eat me" if + Past Simple + Would INFINITIVE Third Conditional: Impossible / Past if + Past Perfect + Would Have PARTICIPLE Summary if + Present Simple + Will INFINITIVE if + Past Simple + Would INFINITIVE if + Past Perfect + Would Have PARTICIPLE 1 2 3 He starts thinking of unreal situations:
He hopes he had wings
He hoped a boat appeared He thinks:
“If I had wings, I would fly home” He thinks
“If I had a boat, I would sail home” The second conditional is like the first conditional. We are still thinking about the future; but there is not a real possibility that this condition will happen. It is like a dream. It's not very real, but it's still possible. We use the past simple tense to talk about the future condition. We use WOULD + INFINITIVE to talk about the future result. “If I could fly, I would fly home” “If I had a boat, I would sail home” After some time...
A friend of him, Tim, is flying in his helicopter ...
when he suddenly sees Tom’s red shirt!
Tim saves Tom.
Once in the helicopter Tom says: “If I had not worn a red shirt, you would not have seen me”
“If you had decided to stay home today, I would have died!”
“If I had not worn a red shirt, you would not have seen me”
“If you had decided to stay home today, I would have died!”
The first conditional and second conditionals talk about the future. With the third conditional we talk about the past. We talk about a condition in the past that did not happen. That is why there is no possibility for this condition. The third conditional is also like a dream, but with no possibility of the dream coming true.
Notice that we are thinking about an impossible past condition. We use the past perfect tense to talk about the impossible past condition. We use WOULD HAVE + past participle to talk about the impossible past result. The important thing about the third conditional is that both the condition and result are impossible now. by Marta Teacher
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